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Formula 1 All Time Memorable Races


2019 XXXV Magyar NagydíjMogyoród, Hungary 2019 XXXV Magyar NagydíjAt the Hungaroring for the Grand Prix (306.5 kilometers) in August, a German Mercedes W10 under Lewis Hamilton (GB) bests the field in 1:35:03.8 (average 120.27 mph), under eighteen seconds ahead of a Red Bull driven by Max Verstappen. Mercedes, gambling over the protests of second-running Hamilton that his medium-soft rubber would outlast Verstappen and his wide margin lead, prove all correct after Hamilton scoots around the struggling Verstappen on extremely worn rubber with an outside pass at Turn 1 with only four laps remaining for a dramatic come from behind victory. Verstappen becomes the first Dutch driver to secure a pole position in series history. Photo Credit: Motorsport Images.
2019 XXXIII Großer Preis von ÖsterreichSpielberg, Austria 2019 XXXIII Großer Preis von ÖsterreichAt the Red Bull Ring for the Austrian Grand Prix (306.5 kilometers) in June, an Austrian Red Bull RB15 Honda under Max Verstappen (NL) notches a victory in 1:22:01.8 (average 139.34 mph), under three seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Charles Leclerc. Verstappen moves out front after passing race leader Leclerc on the inside line of Turn 3 with less than three laps remaining. The Verstappen attack at the moment of truth leads both entries to tangle, which in turn drives Leclerc wide and well outside of circuit limits during the overtake, yet the stewards opt not to parse the incident, leaving Verstappen with a dramatic victory in the home race for his constructor. Photo Credit: Fox Sports.
2019 LXXVII Grand Prix de Monaco Monte Carlo 2019 LXXVII Grand Prix de Monaco At Monaco for the Grand Prix (260.5 kilometers) in May, a German Mercedes W10 under Lewis Hamilton (GB) takes race honors in 1:43:28.4 (average 93.78 mph), under three seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Sebastian Vettel. Hamilton and Max Verstappen of Red Bull battle through service with differing tire strategies and despite driving on arguably superior rubber, Verstappen fails at his final lunge and touch for the lead at the Nouvelle Chicane with only two laps remaining, allowing Hamilton to brilliantly escape with his third career cross in the principality. The stewards later demote Verstappen to fourth for an unsafe release in the service lane during the contest. Photo Credit: Motorsport Images.
2019 LVI Grand Prix du CanadaMontréal, Quebec 2019 LVI Grand Prix du CanadaAt Montréal for the Canadian Grand Prix (305.5 kilometers) in June, a German Mercedes W10 under Lewis Hamilton (GB) takes the flag in 1:29:07.1 (average 125.84 mph), under four seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Sebastian Vettel. Vettel leads from the pole with Hamilton in hot pursuit until Lap 47 of 70, where an error by Vettel at Turn 4 forces him to leave the circuit. The return by Vettel across the grass and back onto the circuit chops off Hamilton, then attempting to dart past, and the resulting pinch drives Hamilton off the circuit for several meters before both resume racing. Observers howl and bicker over the incident as Vettel deftly holds off Hamilton by just over two seconds over the remaining distance, yet the stewards afterwards dock Vettel five seconds for an unsafe return, handing another victory gift to the star-kissed Hamilton. A petulant Vettel refuses to drive back to parc ferme until late in the cooldown period before defiantly switching the FIA first place finishing signage from the winning Mercedes to his own entry. Photo Credit: Z. Mauger.
2019 Grande Prêmio Do BrasilSão Paulo, Brazil 2019 Grande Prêmio Do BrasilAt Interlagos for the Grand Prix (306 kilometers) in November, the race comes to an Austrian Red Bull RB15 under Max Verstappen (NL) in 1:33:14.68 (122.32 mph), under seven seconds ahead of a Toro Rosso driven by Pierre Gasly. Red Bull outwits Mercedes in the tire war over the closing miles and Max Verstappen of Red Bull seizes his opportunity after the final restart at Lap 60. Verstappen deftly pulls alongside race leader Lewis Hamilton of Mercedes at Turn 1 before riding the outside rail at Turn 2 and squirming his way past Hamilton before sprinting away for a dramatic race victory. Late race tangles between Ferrari racers Sebastien Vettel and Charles Leclerc (Lap 66 of 71) and Hamilton and Alexander Albon of Red Bull on the final circuit creates a thrilling finish as Pierre Gasly of Toro Rosso narrowly holds off Hamilton (later demoted in the results) for P2. Photo Credit: Attribution Not Available.
2017 I Azerbaijan Grand Prix Baku, Azerbaijan 2017 I Azerbaijan Grand Prix At Baku for the inaugural Azerbaijan Grand Prix (306.5 kilometers) in June, an Austrian Red Bull RB13 TAG Heuer under Daniel Ricciardo (AU) takes race honors in 2:03:55.6 (average 92.07 mph), under four seconds ahead of a Mercedes driven by Valtteri Bottas. The race turns on Lap 19 of 51 after points leader Sebastian Vettel in his Ferrari inexplicably collides with the rear of contender Lewis Hamilton in his Mercedes under a caution condition. As Vettel angrily alleges over his radio that the collision resulted from brake-testing by Hamilton, the contest continues until a loose headrest on the Hamilton entry attributable to his earlier tangle with Vettel prompts Race Control to retire the Briton from the contest on Lap 31. Vettel anxiously awaits a decision by the stewards on his set-to with Hamilton and receives to his extreme dismay a ten-second penalty on Lap 33, thus gifting the virtual lead to an unsuspecting Ricciardo, who drives without error to the finish. Photo Credit: Pixel 8000.
2016 XLVI Gran Premio de España Barcelona, Spain 2016 XLVI Gran Premio de España At Catalunya for the Spanish Grand Prix (307.5 kilometers), the race comes an Austrian Red Bull RB12 Tag Heuer driven by Max Verstappen (NL) in 1:41:40.02 (average 1112.62 mph), under a second (.616) ahead of a Ferrari driven by Kimi Räikkönen. Verstappen, son of former F1 driver Jos and driving in his very first race for the upper-tier Red Bull team, takes his maiden career victory after passing race leader and teammate Daniel Ricciardo in a companion entry on Lap 44 of 66 after the final round of service. The eighteen-year old Verstappen becomes the youngest driver and first of Dutch nationality to notch an F1 cross in series history. Mercedes pilots Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg eliminate each other from race contention in spectacular fashion at Turn 4 on the leadout circuit. Photo Credit: Sky Sports.
2016 XXX Großer Preis von Österreich Spielberg, Austria 2016 XXX Großer Preis von Österreich At the Red Bull Ring for the Austrian Grand Prix (307 kilometers) in July, a German Mercedes F1 W07 under Lewis Hamilton (GB) takes the flag in 1:27:38.1 (average 130.61 mph), under six seconds ahead of a Red Bull driven by Max Verstappen. In a thrilling trip around the final circuit, second running Hamilton attempts a daring pass on race leading teammate Nico Rosberg driving a companion Mercedes at Turn 2 and both entries tangle, forcing Hamilton wide off the circuit. Rosberg suffers wing damage and Hamilton bests the German upon his return to the track at the next corner before holding off Rosberg for a dramatic victory. Spectators jeer Hamilton for his race closing during the postrace podium ceremony as the Mercedes brass fumes over the third contact race between the two pilots. Photo Credit: Sky Sports.
2014 XLV Grand Prix du Canada Montréal, Quebec 2014 XLV Grand Prix du Canada At Montréal for the Canadian Grand Prix (305.5 kilometers) in June, an Austrian Red Bull RB10 Renault under Daniel Ricciardo (AU) takes race honors in 1:39:12.8 (average 114.71 mph), finishing ahead of a Mercedes driven by Nico Rosberg under a caution condition. After the Mercedes entries suffer mechanicals attributable to their respective turbo-hybrid power units, Ricciardo moves out front after taking advantage of DRS and passing race leader Rosberg at the Turn 13 entry with only three laps remaining for his maiden F1 victory. Photo Credit: XPB Images.
2011 XLVIII Grand Prix du Canada 2011 Montréal, Quebec 2011 XLVIII Grand Prix du Canada 2011 At Gilles Villeneuve for the Canadian Grand Prix (305.5 kilometers) in June, a British McLaren MP4-26 Mercedes under Jensen Button (GB) takes the flag in rainy conditions in 4:04:39.5 (average 46.52 mph), under three seconds ahead of a Red Bull driven by Sebastian Vettel. Button, after tangling with teammate Lewis Hamilton on Lap 7, stopping for service six times, once for a drive-through penalty, and trailing the entire field with thirty laps to go, steadily progress up through the pack in the rain and prevails after race leader Vettel slides wide in the wet in a corner on the final circuit, allowing the Briton to dramatically slip through for a surprising victory. The heavy rains significantly impact visibility and prompts an over two-hour red flag condition. Photo Credit: Associated Press.
2010 Turkish Grand PrixIstanbul, Turkey 2010 Turkish Grand PrixAt Istanbul for the Turkish Grand Prix (309.5 kilometers) in May, a British McLaren MP4-25 Mercedes under Lewis Hamilton (GB) takes race honors in 1:28:47.6 (average 129.91 mph), under three seconds ahead of a companion Mercedes driven by Jenson Button. Hamilton inherits the race lead after Red Bull front runners Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel infamously tangle and collide on Lap 40, eliminating both drivers from contention. Photo Credit: Francis Flamand.
2008 ING Belgian Grand Prix Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 2008 ING Belgian Grand Prix At Spa for the Belgian Grand Prix (308.5 kilometers) in September, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari F2008 under Felipe Massa (BR) takes the flag in rainy conditions in 1:22:59.4 (average 138.44 mph), under ten seconds ahead of a BMW Sauber driven by Nick Heidfeld. Lewis Hamilton in his McLaren, after passing race leader Kimi Räikkönen in his Ferrari with only two laps remaining, beats all across the line, yet the stewards penalize the Briton for cutting a chicane during his pass. Although Hamilton allows Räikkönen to resume the lead before completing a second pass at La Source, the stewards in controversial fashion still deem Hamilton as gaining a racing advantage with his move. Hamilton’s 25-second penalty, plus an off Räikkönen’s in the heavy rain on the final circuit, gifts the contest to a jubilant Massa. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
2008 XXXVII Grande Prêmio do Brasil São Paulo, Brazil 2008 XXXVII Grande Prêmio do Brasil At São Paulo for the Brazilian Grand Prix (306 kilometers) in November, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari F2008 under Felipe Massa (BR) bests the field in rainy conditions in 1:34:11.4 (average 121.08 mph), under fourteen seconds ahead of a Renault entry. Entering the final contest, Massa trails F1 title leader Lewis Hamilton in his McLaren by seven points, and a Massa victory plus a sixth or lower placing for Hamilton would grant the Brazilian his coveted F1 drivers’ title. Massa performs his duties and wins the contest from the pole, yet Hamilton passes Timo Glock in the final corners of the final circuit to secure fifth position and win the drivers’ championship by a single point. The 23-year old Hamilton ascends as the youngest driver to win the drivers’ title, as well as the first driver of African descent to do the same. Massa afterwards stands devastated with the final result. Photo Credit: Glenn Dunbar.
2005 XLIX Formula 1 Grand Prix of Europe Nürburg, Germany 2005 XLIX Formula 1 Grand Prix of Europe At the Nürburgring for the European Grand Prix (303.5 kilometers) in May, a French Renault R25 under Fernando Alonso (ES) takes race honors in 1:31:46.6 (average 125.43 mph), under seventeen seconds ahead of a Williams entry. Alonso moves out front on the final circuit after race leader Kimi Räikkönen in his McLaren drops his right front suspension in Turn 1 and in dramatic fashion spins off the circuit into a nearby gravel trap. Photo Credit: Steven Tee.
2005 XXXIV United States Grand Prix Indianapolis, Indiana 2005 XXXIV United States Grand Prix At Indianapolis for the United States Grand Prix (306 kilometers) in June, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari F2005 under Michael Schumacher (DE) takes the flag in 1:29:43.2 (average 127.16 mph), under two seconds ahead of a companion Ferrari driven by Rubens Barrichello. The race includes only six entries after the constructors running on Michelin rubber elect not to compete over concerns regarding tire wear after a hard shunt by Ralf Schumacher during practice rattles the nerves of supplier Michelin. The FIA blackens its own eye after refusing requests by Michelin to switch to a different compound for the contest as well as to add a chicane to slow down the entries, and the jeering spectators as well as IMS express outrage over the sanctioning body decision to start with such an uncompelling field. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
2001 XXX Grande Prêmio do Brasil São Paulo, Brazil 2001 XXX Grande Prêmio do Brasil At Carlos Pace for the Brazilian Grand Prix in April, the race comes to a British McLaren MP4-16 Mercedes under David Coulthard (GB) in wet conditions in 1:39:00.8 (average 115.19 mph), under seventeen seconds ahead of a Ferrari entry. Motorsport enthusiasts across the planet gasp in surprise as USA racing star and Williams driver Juan Pablo Montoya outwrestles the formidable Michael Schumacher in his Ferrari at Senna Curva for the lead on a race restart and bests the reputed German through midrace before backmarker Jos Verstappen in his Arrows unceremoniously dumps Montoya at Turn 4 on Lap 38 of 71. Schumacher inherits the lead after his service cycle and controls the race until uncharacteristically spinning off at Turn 4 on Lap 48. Second place runner Coulthard closes in on Schumacher, passes the Ferrari one lap later, and motors on for a comfortable and surely unexpected race victory. Photo Credit: Antonio Scorza.
1999 I Malaysian Grand Prix Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia 1999 I Malaysian Grand Prix At Sepang for the inaugural Malaysian Grand Prix (310.5 kilometers) in October, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari F399 under Eddie Irvine (GB) takes the flag in 1:36:38.5 (average 119.73 mph), under two seconds ahead of a companion Ferrari driven by Michael Schumacher. Working to assist his teammate to the championship, Schumacher runs slow interference for Irvine over the distance until finally waving Irvine by into the lead with only four laps remaining. The race stewards three hours later summarily disqualify the Ferrari entries on grounds of running with illegal aerodynamic devices, thus promoting Mika Häkkinen of McLaren as the winner and virtually ending any title hopes for Irvine. The FIA subsequently overrules the stewards and reinstates Irvine and Schumacher to their original finishing positions, leaving the drivers’ title down to the season finale at Suzuka. Schumacher makes a heady return after recovering from a broken leg inflicted in a shunt three months prior during the British Grand Prix. Photo Credit: Scuderia Ferrari.
1998 LVI Belgian Grand Prix Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1998 LVI Belgian Grand Prix At Spa for the Belgian Grand Prix (306.5 kilometers) in August, a British Jordan 198 Mugen Honda under Damon Hill (GB) unexpectedly notches a victory in rainy conditions in 1:43:47.4 (average 110.13 mph), under a second (.932) ahead of a companion Jordan driven by Ralf Schumacher. Hill moves out front after race leader Michael Schumacher in his Ferrari, gingerly picking his way through backmarker traffic in the wet, erringly crashes into the rear of David Coulthard in his McLaren and disables his own entry with nineteen laps remaining. Jordan finally snares its maiden F1 constructors’ victory, while points leader Mika Häkkinen of McLaren drops out amidst a thirteen-car pileup on Lap 1. Photo Credit: Steven Tee.
1997 European Grand Prix Jerez, Spain 1997 European Grand Prix At the season finale at Jerez for the European Grand Prix (305.5 kilometers) in October, a British McLaren MP4-12 Mercedes under Mika Häkkinen (FI) notches a victory in 1:38:57.8 (average 115.10 mph), under two seconds ahead of a companion McLaren driven by David Coulthard. With the F1 drivers’ title on the line, Jacques Villeneuve must finish ahead of Michael Schumacher in sixth position or higher to claim the drivers' crown. Schumacher in his Ferrari leads the first 47 of 69 laps before Villeneuve in his Williams attempts an inside passing move at Curva Dry Sack on Lap 48, pulling his nose even with Schumacher before the latter on cue intentionally veers his entry into the left side pod of Villeneuve. Villeneuve dramatically manages to catch and maintain control over his entry while Schumacher glumly slews off the circuit and retires, gifting the Canadian his maiden F1 drivers’ championship. Villeneuve, nursing home his damaged entry, wisely allows the McLarens through on the final circuit to settle matters, and Häkkinen secures his maiden F1 victory as the race stewards promptly disqualify Schumacher from the championship result while allowing him to keep his season race statistics. Schumacher without contrition denies any malicious intent in the incident yet accepts the FIA decision as Villeneuve becomes the third driver to win the F1 title and the Indianapolis 500 (Mario Andretti, Emerson Fittipaldi). Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1995 XLVIII British Grand Prix Silverstone, England 1995 XLVIII British Grand Prix At Silverstone for the British Grand Prix (308.5 kilometers) in July, an Italian Benetton B195 Renault under Johnny Herbert (GB) takes the flag in 1:34:35.1 (average 121.59 mph), under seventeen seconds ahead of a Ferrari entry. Damon Hill in his Williams, chasing down race leader Michael Schumacher in his Benetton, attempts a daring pass with fifteen laps remaining and meets with disaster after Schumacher on cue turns his entry into Hill, eliminating both drivers. Herbert later moves out front past successive leader David Coulthard in his Williams four laps later after Race Control issues Coulthard a ten-second penalty for speeding in the service lane, gifting Herbert his maiden career F1 victory on home soil. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
1995 XL Grand Prix of Europe Nürburg, Germany 1995 XL Grand Prix of Europe At the Nürburgring for the Grand Prix of Europe (305.5 kilometers) in October, an Italian Benetton B195 Renault under Michael Schumacher (DE) notches a victory in damp conditions in 1:39:59.04 (average 113.82 mph), under three seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Jean Alesi. Schumacher applies the heavy pressure to race leader Alesi in the closing laps, even forcing the latter off the circuit, before moving out front with a daring pass that involves some minor contact at the circuit chicane with only two laps remaining. Photo Credit: Pascal Rondeau.
1994 XIV Gran Premio di San Marino Imola, Italy 1994 XIV Gran Premio di San Marino At Imola for the San Marino Grand Prix (292.5 kilometers) in May, the race comes to an Italian Benetton B194 Ford under Michael Schumacher (DE) in 1:28:28.6 (average 123.18 mph), under fifty-five seconds ahead of a Ferrari entry. Schumacher easily snares his third consecutive victory on the season, yet on one of the most tragic weekends in global motorsport history, the race claims the lives of race leader and three-time champion Ayrton Senna, who perishes after his Williams inexplicably slams into a concrete barrier at high speed at Tamburello on Lap 7, and Simtek driver Roland Ratzenberger, who suffers a fatal off-track shunt after losing his front wing during a qualifying session. Enthusiasts still wonder aloud at why race officials elect not to red flag the contest after the Senna horror. The FIA immediately installs a new regime of regulations to promote driver safety, including pit lane speeds. Photo Credit: Williams Racing.
1994 LIX Australian Grand Prix Adelaide, South Australia 1994 LIX Australian Grand Prix At Adelaide for the Australian Grand Prix (306.5 kilometers) for the season finale in November, a British Williams 3FW16 Renault under Nigel Mansell (GB) notches a victory in 1:47:51.5 (average 105.83 mph), under three seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Gerhard Berger. High drama ensues on Lap 35 after race leader Michael Schumacher in his Benetton, under pressure from pursuer Damon Hill in his Williams, collides with the wall. Hill takes advantage of the Schumacher miscue and moves inside to pass the hobbled Schumacher for the lead, yet the wily Schumacher, still leading the drivers’ title by a single point, intentionally slews right into the left side of Hill before the contact sends Schumacher soaring into the air. Schumacher immediately retires after the incident, yet Hill suffers deep disappointment soon thereafter after learning of his own damaged suspension while receiving service. An inconsolable Hill retires from the contest as the sidelined Schumacher ascends as the first German to win the drivers’ title in the modern F1 era. Most drivers in the aftermath deem the shunt as a racing incident, yet many other observers still accuse Schumacher of unsporting-like behavior. Photo Credit: Rainer Nyberg.
1993 European Grand Prix Donington, England 1993 European Grand Prix At Donington Park for the European Grand Prix (305.5 kilometers) in April, the race comes to a British McLaren MP4-8 Ford under Ayrton Senna (BR) in rainy conditions in 1:50:46.6 (average 102.90 mph), under ninety seconds ahead of a Williams entry. In another masterful performance in the rain, Senna continually outfoxes the field by risking running on slicks during wet conditions and deftly leaves the remaining field riding on skates while motoring off to a comfortable victory. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
1992 L Grand Prix de Monaco Monte Carlo 1992 L Grand Prix de Monaco At Monaco for the fiftieth running of the Grand Prix (259.5 kilometers) in May, the race comes to a British McLaren MP4-7A Honda under Ayrton Senna (BR) in 1:50:59.4 (average 87.19 mph), under a second (.215) ahead of a Williams driven by Nigel Mansell. Senna moves out front after race leader Mansell stops for service to address a loose rear wheel with eight laps remaining, and then effectively blocks his opponent with deft skill over the closing laps for his fourth consecutive victory at Monte Carlo and fifth for his career, matching the great Graham Hill. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1991 Grand Prix of Canada Montréal, Quebec 1991 Grand Prix of Canada At Gilles Villeneuve for the Canadian Grand Prix (305.5 kilometers) in June, an Italian Benetton B191 Ford under Nelson Piquet (BR) takes race honors in 1:38:51.5 (average 115.28 mph), under thirty-two seconds ahead of a Tyrrell entry. Piquet moves out front after Nigel Mansell in his Williams, after waving to the crowd in triumph while nursing a comfortable lead, stalls his engine on the final circuit only a hundred yards from the wire, allowing a stunned Piquet to pass for the surprising win. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1990 XVI Japanese Grand Prix Suzuka City, Japan 1990 XVI Japanese Grand Prix At Suzuka for the Japanese Grand Prix (310.5 kilometers) in October, an Italian Benetton B190 Ford under Nelson Piquet (BR) notches a victory in 1:34:36.8 (average 122.37 mph), under eight seconds ahead of a companion Benetton driven by Roberto Moreno. Drama ensues at the start after pole-sitter Ayrton Senna in his McLaren and Alain Prost in his Ferrari, both sitting on the front row on the grid, sprint off the grid towards Turn 1. Senna, utterly furious that Prost gets to starts on the clean side of the track despite his pole status, prior to the race requests race officials to allow him to switch positions with Prost on the front row, yet FISA refuses him the same. Convinced that FISA consistently seeks to provide Prost and Scuderia Ferrari with any racing advantage possible, Senna on the Turn 1 approach deliberately cuts inside and rams the Prost Ferrari into the gravel pit in a grim repeat of the 1989 debacle at the same corner. Both cars retire due to damage and the impetuous collision between the two racing greats on Lap 1 gifts the F1 drivers’ title to Senna. Alessandro Nannini suffers career-ending injuries after surviving a helicopter crash prior to the contest. Photo Credit: Getty Images.
1989 XV Japanese Grand Prix Suzuka City, Japan 1989 XV Japanese Grand Prix At Suzuka for the Japanese Grand Prix (310.5 kilometers) in October, an Italian Benetton B189 Ford under Alessandro Nannini (IT) crosses first in 1:35:06.3 (average 121.74 mph), under twelve seconds ahead of a Williams entry. Drama ensues with only seven laps remaining after McLaren driver Ayrton Senna, hotly chasing race leader and teammate Alain Prost for victory and the F1 drivers' title, dives inside for a pass just before the start/finish line. Prost shamelessly shuts the door on Senna and both cars tangle before stalling in a nearby sand trap. Prost abandons his entry, yet race marshals push Senna back onto the track to continue the contest. Senna cuts through the incident chicane upon return, stops for service, and in one of the most memorable performances in F1 history rallies ahead to pass Nannini with three laps remaining for a three-second victory. Race officials afterwards strike the final result on grounds that the Senna-Prost shunt caused Senna not to complete a full lap (missed chicane) and thus Senna did not complete the contest. Race officials disqualify Senna, gifting Nannini his maiden F1 victory and Prost the 1989 drivers' title. McLaren appeals the decision, yet the FIA upholds the result and pours on the grief by fining Senna $100,000 USD, leaving the Brazilian to angrily accuse the FIA of plotting against him in favor of Prost. Photo Credit: Toshifumi Kitamura.
1988 LIX Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1988 LIX Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (296 kilometers) in September, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari F187/88C under Gerhard Berger (AT) takes race honors in 1:17:39.7 (average 142.00 mph), under a second (.502) ahead of a companion Ferrari driven by Michele Alboreto. The Ferrari fortunes turn for the good after Alain Prost in his McLaren loses drive on Lap 34, yet the drama ensues when race leader Ayrton Senna in his own McLaren attempts a pass of backmarker Jean-Louis Schlesser in his Williams at Rettifilo with only two laps remaining. Senna closes the door after his inside pass, yet Schlesser smashes into his rear suspension and Senna can only watch as the Ferraris sweep by and claim a precious victory for their late founder Enzo, who passed away a month prior, on his home soil. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1987 XL British Grand Prix Silverstone, England 1987 XL British Grand Prix At Silverstone for the British Grand Prix (310.5 kilometers) in July, a British Williams FW11B Honda under Nigel Mansell (GB) takes race honors in 1:19:11.8 (average 146.20 mph), under two seconds ahead of a companion Williams driven by Nelson Piquet. Mansell moves out front after passing race leader Piquet with a remarkable move at Stowe with less than three laps remaining as both Williams entries lap the entire field. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1986 Gran Premio de España Jerez, Spain 1986 Gran Premio de España At Jerez for the Spanish Grand Prix (303.5 kilometers) in April, the race comes to a British Lotus 98T Renault under Ayrton Senna (BR) in 1:48:47.7 (average 104.07 mph), under a second (.014) ahead of a Williams driven by Nigel Mansell. Mansell, charging forward on fresh rubber after receiving late service with only nine laps remaining, finally chases down race leader Senna on the final circuit before pulling even on the final corner, yet Senna edges out the Briton by a nose to capture the narrow victory with the closest finishing margin in modern F1 history. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
1986 Australian Grand Prix Adelaide, South Australia 1986 Australian Grand Prix At Adelaide for the Australian Grand Prix (310 kilometers) for the season finale in October, a British McLaren MP4-2C TAG Porsche under Alain Prost (FR) takes the flag in 1:54:20.4 (average 101.07 mph), under five seconds ahead of a Williams driven by Nelson Piquet. Prost seals his second consecutive F1 drivers' title after race and points leader Nigel Mansell in his Williams drops a left rear tire on Lap 65 of 82, leaving Prost to pick up the leavings and sprint to a thrilling ending to the 1986 campaign. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1983 San Marino Grand Prix Imola, Italy 1983 San Marino Grand Prix At Imola for the San Marino Grand Prix (302.5 kilometers) in May, the race comes to an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 126C2B under Patrick Tambay (FR) in 1:37:52.5 (average 115.19 mph), under forty-nine seconds ahead of a Renault entry. Riccardo Patrese in his Brabham passes race leader Tambay with only six laps remaining, yet a moment later the Italian loses control of his entry at Acque Minerale, skids off the circuit, and crashes hard into the ARMCO, gifting a victory to Tambay and Ferrari before the jubilant tifosi. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1982 X Grande Prêmio do Brasil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1982 X Grande Prêmio do Brasil At Jacarepagua for the Brazilian Grand Prix (317 kilometers) on a very warm day (93 degrees) in March, the race comes to a British Brabham BT49D Ford under Nelson Piquet (BR) in 1:43:53.8 (average 113.02 mph), under thirteen seconds ahead of a Williams entry. Piquet moves out front on Lap 35 of 63 after race leaders Gilles Villeneuve in his Ferrari and Riccardo Patrese in his Brabham each spin out on the circuit, allowing Piquet to inherit the point. Piquet crosses first at the wire on home soil and then subsequently faints on the podium from heat exhaustion, yet temperatures rise even higher after Scuderia Ferrari and Renault, both non-FOCA teams, afterwards protest the result on grounds that the FOCA teams utilize water tanks for deceptive ballast rather than the ostensible reason for cooling. The FIA agrees, disqualifies both Piquet and Rosberg of Williams days later from the result, and promotes Alain Prost and Renault as the race winner. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1982 II Gran Premio di San Marino Imola, Italy 1982 II Gran Premio di San Marino At Imola for the San Marino Grand Prix (302.5 kilometers) in April, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 126C2 under Didier Pironi (FR) takes race honors in 1:36:38.9 (average 116.65 mph), under a second (.37) ahead of a companion Ferrari driven by Gilles Villeneuve. Pironi, in open defiance of Ferrari team orders, dices with teammate Villeneuve over the closing laps before moving out front with a pass of his teammate at Tosa on the final circuit. Both drivers afterwards refuse to shake hands on the podium. FOCA constructors Williams, Brabham, and McLaren opt to boycott the contest after FISA mandates that all entries must weigh a minimum of 580 kilograms, all in response to the ballast chicanery utilized by the British constructors in prior events. The British FOCA entries, which do not carry heavier blown engines, contend that the new weight restrictions unfairly penalize their cars. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1982 XL Circuit de Monaco Monte Carlo 1982 XL Circuit de Monaco At Monaco for the Grand Prix (251.5 kilometers) in May, a British Brabham BT49D Ford under Riccardo Patrese (IT) notches a victory in light rains in 1:54:11.3 (average 82.18 mph), a lap ahead of a Ferrari entry. Patrese briefly moves out front after race leader Alain Prost in his Renault inexplicably loses control and smashes into the guardrail with only four laps remaining. Patrese shortly thereafter bobbles at the Loews hairpin, allowing Didier Pironi in his Ferrari to slip past into the lead. Much to his frustration, Pironi exhausts his fuel supply in the Tunnel on the final circuit only two kilometers from the finish and Patrese, unaware of the race order, fortuitously inherits his maiden F1 victory, the first for Brabham (Hulme) in the principality since the 1967 season. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1982 XV Großer Preis von Österreich Knittelfeld, Austria 1982 XV Großer Preis von Österreich At the Osterreichring for the Austrian Grand Prix (315 kilometers) in August, a British Lotus 91 Ford under Elio de Angelis (IT) crosses first in 1:25:02.2 (average 138.08 mph), under a second (.05) ahead of a Williams driven by Keke Rosberg. De Angelis moves out front after race leader Alain Prost in his Renault drops a turbocharger with only five laps remaining. Rosberg submits a last challenge to De Angelis on the final circuit, yet the Finn stalls at Rindtkurve, allowing De Angelis to hold off Rosberg by a mere nose at the wire to preserve his maiden F1 victory. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1981 Grand Prix of Belgium Heusden-Zolder, Belgium 1981 Grand Prix of Belgium At Zolder for the Belgian Grand Prix (298.5 kilometers) in May, a British Williams FW07C Ford under Carlos Reutemann (AR) takes race honors in heavy rains in 1:16:31.6 (average 112.14 mph), under thirty-seven seconds ahead of a Ligier entry. The race weekend begins in horrific fashion as Reutemann strikes an Osella mechanic during a practice session who subsequently succumbs to his injuries. The pending race start devolves into a debacle as the drivers stage a moving protest on the formation lap that in turn strings out the field. Just prior to the start, the stalled Arrows entry of Riccardo Patrese creates bedlam on the grid and in the ensuing chaos Siegried Stohr in his Arrows slams into the back of Patrese, who in turn strikes and runs over an Arrows mechanic, who suffers a pair of broken legs in the melee. The madness continues as the entries roar off the grid while trackside marshals perilously attempt to wave off the start. After the drivers learn of the incident at the lights, all simply stop after the completion of Lap 1 and refuse to immediately restart the contest. The race finally restarts under wet conditions after an extended period and Reutemann moves out front on Lap 20 of 70 after race leader Alan Jones in his Williams drops a gear and crashes out. Race officials halt the event at Lap 54 due to incessant rains and the teams somberly depart Zolder after a calamitous weekend. Photo Credit: Williams Racing.
1978 Grand Prix of South Africa Kyalami, South Africa 1978 Grand Prix of South Africa At Kyalami for the South African Grand Prix (320 kilometers) in March, the race comes to a British Lotus 78 Ford under Ronnie Peterson (SE) in 1:42:15.8 (average 116.70 mph), under a second (.47) ahead of a Tyrrell driven by Patrick Depailler. Peterson and Depailler tangle wheel-to-wheel on the final circuit, and Peterson ultimately moves out front only a hundred yards from the finish after Depailler suffers a fuel feed problem. Peterson wins his first F1 contest in two seasons. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1977 Grand Prix of Austria Knittelfeld, Austria 1977 Grand Prix of Austria At the Osterreichring for the Austrian Grand Prix (321 kilometers) in August, a British Shadow DN8 Ford under Alan Jones (AU) wins in 1:37:16.5 (average 122.99 mph), under twenty-one seconds ahead of a Ferrari entry. Jones moves out front after race leader James Hunt in his McLaren drops an engine with only eleven laps remaining. Jones earns a maiden F1 victory for both himself and constructor Shadow. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1976 XXXVIII Großer Preis von Deutschland Mayen, West Germany 1976 XXXVIII Großer Preis von Deutschland At the Nürburgring for the German Grand Prix (320 kilometers) in August, a British McLaren M23 Ford under James Hunt (GB) crosses first in wet conditions in 1:41:42.7 (average 117.19 mph), under twenty-eight seconds ahead of a Tyrrell entry. Hunt leads wire-to-wire for the entire distance, yet disaster strikes on the opening lap after Niki Lauda in his Ferrari drops a wheel at Bergwerk and careens hard through the ARMCO and into an earthen bank before his entry explodes into flames. Backmarker entries strike Lauda as his Ferrari slews back onto the circuit, and the Austrian suffers critical injuries from the ensuing burns. Driver Arturo Merzario and two others extract the semi-conscious Lauda from his burning vehicle, and many expected the driver not to survive the horrific ordeal. In miraculous fashion, the indomitable Lauda returns to racing six weeks later at Monza. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1976 XI Japanese Grand Prix Oyama, Japan 1976 XI Japanese Grand Prix At Fuji for the first time for the Japanese Grand Prix (318 kilometers) in October, the race comes to a British Lotus 77 Ford under Mario Andretti (US) in 1:43:58.9 (average 114.11 mph), a lap ahead of a Tyrrell entry. Rain and fog shroud the course at race start and the perilous conditions prompt Niki Lauda in his Ferrari to abandon the contest on Lap 1, thus ceding his drivers' title hopes. Hunt, trailing Lauda by three points in the title chase, experiences his own troubles with rubber that pushes him back down the field, yet his late rally earns him a P3 and the drivers' championship in one of the most intriguing campaigns in F1 history. Hunt, who believes the title lost after crossing the finish, later expresses sincere empathy for close friend Lauda. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
1974 XVII United States Grand Prix Watkins Glen, New York 1974 XVII United States Grand Prix At Watkins Glen for the United States Grand Prix (199 miles) in October, a British MRD Brabham BT44 Ford under Carlos Reutemann (AR) crosses first in 1:40:21.4 (average 119.13 mph), under eleven seconds ahead of a companion Brabham entry. Reutemann unexpectedly leads wire-to-wire for the contest win, yet a poor handling Ferrari under Clay Regazzoni and a retirement by Jody Scheckter on Lap 45 gifts the fourth-finishing Fittipaldi with his second F1 drivers' crown. The race claims the life of Helmuth Koinigg, who perishes after losing control of his Surtees and crashing into the guardrail on Lap 10. Photo Credit: David Phipps.
1973 French Grand Prix Le Castellet, France 1973 French Grand Prix At Paul Ricard for the French Grand Prix (314 kilometers) in July, a British Lotus 72E Ford under Ronnie Peterson (SE) notches a victory in 1:41:36.5 (average 115.12 mph), under forty-one seconds ahead of a Tyrell entry. Peterson, after allowing swifter Jody Scheckter in his McLaren through to take his shot at race leader Emerson Fittipaldi in his Lotus, takes full advantage after Fittipaldi and Scheckter tangle at the Bridge Curve with only twelve laps remaining. Peterson snares his maiden Formula 1 victory and avenges his bitter failure at Anderstorp as a very angry Fittipaldi and the McLaren team exchange words after the finish. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1973 VIII Race of Champions West Kingsdown, England 1973 VIII Race of Champions At Brands Hatch for the Race of Champions (170.5 kilometers, non-championship) in March, the race comes to a Formula 5000 British Chevron B24 Chevrolet under Peter Gethin (GB) in 0:57:22.9 (average 110.35 mph), under four seconds ahead of a McLaren driven by Denis Hulme. A calamity of shunts and mechanical failures leaves Gethin in position in the closing laps, who then moves out front on the final circuit after race leader Hulme drops a clutch bearing, gifting Gethin with a wondrous upset victory with his F5000 entry over the F1 racing set. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1973 XXV BRDC International Trophy Silverstone, England 1973 XXV BRDC International Trophy At Silverstone for the BRDC International Trophy race (188.5 kilometers, non-championship) in April, a Tyrrell 006 Ford under Jackie Stewart (GB) takes race honors in 0:52:53.2 (average 132.83 mph), under eleven seconds ahead of a Lotus driven by Ronnie Peterson. Stewart runs down race leader Peterson on Lap 2 only to spin out at Becketts a few laps later and drop back to sixth position. Undeterred, Stewart resumes the chase and closes in on Peterson just as snow flurries begin to fall upon the circuit. With both drivers pressing hard in the treacherous conditions, Stewart manages to slip past Peterson before both entries slide off the slick circuit. Stewart recovers first, continues his press through the flurries, and crosses for a dramatic victory in the most unanticipated of race conditions. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1971 XLII Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1971 XLII Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (316 kilometers) in September, a British Yardley B.R.M. P160 under Peter Gethin (GB) takes the flag in 1:18:12.6 (record average 150.75 mph), under a second (.01) ahead of a March driven by Ronnie Petersen. Gethin moves out front after narrowly nosing out Peterson at the wire as the first four placing entries all finish within seven-tenths of a second. Gethin posts both the fastest race and the closest winning margin in arguably the most thrilling finish in Formula 1 history. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1970 XXVIII Grand Prix de Monaco Monte Carlo 1970 XXVIII Grand Prix de Monaco At Monaco for the Grand Prix (251.5 kilometers) in May, the race comes to a British Lotus 49C Ford under Jochen Rindt (AT) in 1:54:37.4 (average 81.85 mph), under twenty-four seconds ahead of a Brabham entry. Rindt pulls himself up through the field before moving to the front for a stunning victory after race leader Jack Brabham in his eponymous entry suffers brake lock-up upon the race’s final turn and careens into the ARMCO. Rindt finally breaks the magic hold the injured Graham Hill enjoys at Monte Carlo. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1967 XIII Grote Prijs Van Belgie Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1967 XIII Grote Prijs Van Belgie At Spa-Francorchamps for the Belgian Grand Prix (395 kilometers) in June, an American Gurney Eagle T1G Weslake under Dan Gurney (US) takes race honors in 1:40:49.4 (record average 145.99 mph), sixty-three seconds ahead of a B.R.M. entry. After a series of early problems that places him in deep deficit, Gurney rallies back to the front, at time topping 190 mph, and moves out front past race leader Jackie Stewart in his B.R.M. with eight laps remaining. Gurney becomes only the second driver and first American to win a Formula 1 contest with a car of his own make. Briton driver Mike Parkes suffers a horrific overturn shunt on Lap 1 that promptly ends his F1 driving career. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1967 XXXVIII Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1967 XXXVIII Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (391 kilometers) in September, a Japanese Honda RA300 under John Surtees (GB) takes the flag in 1:43:45 (average 140.50 mph), less than a second (.20) ahead of a Brabham driven by Jack Brabham. Jim Clark in his Lotus, after suffering an early tire puncture, races back through the field and overtakes race leader Brabham on Lap 60 before dropping his own fuel pump on the final lap. Surtees in stunning fashion overtakes the slowing Brabham on the final curve for the surprise victory, only the second Grand Prix win for the Honda werks team. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1966 LII Grand Prix de l'ACF Reims, France 1966 LII Grand Prix de l'ACF At Reims for the French Grand Prix (399 kilometers) in July, a British Brabham Repco BT19 under Jack Brabham (AU) takes the flag in 1:48:31.3 (average 136.90 mph), under ten seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Mike Parkes. Brabham moves out front after race leader Lorenzo Bandini in his Ferrari suffers a broken throttle linkage with seventeen laps remaining. Brabham races on to his first F1 victory since 1960 and becomes the first pilot to win a Grand Prix with an entry under his own name and make. Photo Credit: Klemantaski Collection.
1964 III Gran Premio de México México City, México 1964 III Gran Premio de México At Ciudad México for the Mexican Grand Prix (325 kilometers) in October, a British Brabham Climax under Dan Gurney (US) takes the flag in 2:09:50.3 (average 93.32 mph), under sixty-nine seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by John Surtees. In a dramatic season finale in which series points leader Graham Hill, Jim Clark, or Surtees can each win the drivers' title, Clark and Gurney escape from the rest at the start with Hill in hot pursuit and Surtees back in the distance. Calamity strikes Hill on Lap 31 after a tangle with Lorenzo Bandini in his Ferrari sends the Briton into the ARMCO, costing him vital race position relative to Surtees. Clark seemingly speeds away to the championship until his Lotus suffers a disastrous engine failure with only two laps remaining, allowing Gurney through to the front. Recognizing the opportunity, Scuderia Ferrari orders second-running Bandini to allow Surtees through for the points, thus gifting the former motorcycle racing star the F1 drivers' title by a single point over Hill in a stunning result. Photo Credit: Alvis Upitis.
1961 XLVII Grand Prix de l'A.C.F. Reims, France 1961 XLVII Grand Prix de l'A.C.F. At Reims for the French Grand Prix (432 kilometers) on a very warm day (90 degrees) in July, an Italian FISA Ferrari 156 under Giancarlo Baghetti (IT) notches a victory in 2:14:17.5 (average 119.79 mph), under a second ahead of a Porsche driven by Dan Gurney. The top-flight Ferraris under the extreme heat begin to fail beginning at Lap 37 and the inexperienced Baghetti, running in his first Formula 1 contest, dices with Dan Gurney in his Porsche for the remaining distance. Baghetti moves out front after passing Gurney with only a few meters remaining on the final circuit as an Italian driver wins a Formula 1 event for the first time since 1954. Baghetti launches one of the most successful career starts in Grand Prix history with a debut victory at Syracuse and a succeeding triumph at Naples before arriving at Reims for his remarkable afternoon. Photo Credit: David Phipps.
1961 XXXII Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1961 XXXII Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (430 kilometers) in September, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 156 under Phil Hill (US) crosses first in 2:03:13.0 (average 103.20 mph), under thirty-two seconds ahead of a Porsche entry. Hill moves out front past race leader and teammate Richie Ginther on Lap 13 and in grim fashion coasts to victory after Ginther loses drive ten laps later. The race claims the life of reputed driver Wolfgang von Trips, who tangles with Jim Clark at Parabolica on Lap 2 before his auto careens off the course and into the crowd, killing fourteen spectators along with Von Trips. The somber victory by Hill edges him past the departed von Trips in the points chase and he becomes the first American under tragic circumstances to capture the F1 drivers' title. Recriminations surface afterwards in regards to the tragedy and race organizers subsequently elect to eliminate the high banked section along the Monza track configuration out of concerns for safety. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1959 II United States Grand Prix Sebring, Florida 1959 II United States Grand Prix At Sebring for the maiden United States Grand Prix (351.5 kilometers) in December, a British Cooper Climax under Bruce McLaren (NZ) crosses first in 2:12:35.7 (average 98.87 mph), under a second (.60) ahead of Cooper entry. McLaren, the youngest driver to win an F1 contest to date, moves out front on the final circuit after race leader Jack Brabham in his Cooper exhausts his fuel supply just a half-mile from the finish. Brabham pushes his empty Cooper across the line for a fourth place finish, enough to outscore third-place Tony Brooks in his Ferrari in the points and capture his maiden F1 Drivers’ championship. Indy 500 winner Rodger Ward runs a midget entry with an American Offenhauser engine against the European competition to disappointing results. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1958 XIII BARC Aintree 200 Aintree, England 1958 XIII BARC Aintree 200 At Aintree for the BARC 200 (323.5 kilometers) in April, the race comes to a British Cooper Climax T45 under Stirling Moss (GB) in 2:20:47 (average 85.67 mph), under a second (.20) ahead of a Cooper driven by Jack Brabham. Moss swiftly moves out front for the start before overheating and clutch troubles begin to slow his speed at the halfway point. Brabham closes the gap to race leader Moss with four laps remaining and by the final circuit rides close on the tailpipe of Moss. Brabham makes a final lunge at Moss at Tatt's Corner, Moss cuts off his competitor, then Brabham attempts an undercut to reach the inside apex. Both accelerate hard from the corner and Moss narrowly holds off Brabham for a sensational victory. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1955 XIII Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco Monte Carlo 1955 XIII Grand Prix Automobile de Monaco At Monaco for the Grand Prix (314.5 kilometers) in May, the race comes to an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 625 under Maurice Trintignant (FR) in 2:58:09.8 (average 65.66 mph), under twenty-one seconds ahead of a Lancia entry. Trintignant moves out front after race leader Alberto Ascari in his Lancia crashes into the Mediterranean near the Tunnel exit on Lap 20 and succeeding leader Stirling Moss in his Maserati loses fire a lap later. The Monaco layout proves a bit too tight for the Silver Arrows entries to attain maximum performance. Photo Credit: Klemantaski Collection.
1955 VIII RAC British Grand Prix Liverpool, England 1955 VIII RAC British Grand Prix At Aintree for the RAC British Grand Prix (270 miles) in July, a German Daimler Benz Mercedes W196 under Stirling Moss (GB) takes the flag in 3:07:21.2 (average 86.47 mph), under a second (.20) ahead of a companion Mercedes driven by Juan Manuel Fangio in finish formation. Moss dices with Fangio before moving out front on Lap 35, and Fangio patiently waits in his wake. As both entries complete the final circuit and approach the final corner, Fangio sets up Moss for a pass. Moss, out of position, waves Fangio through, yet the Argentine backs off the accelerator and graciously allows Moss to triumph on home soil. Mercedes sweeps the top four positions as Moss becomes the first Briton to win a host Grand Prix. The FIA announces beforehand its intention to cancel the German, Swiss, and Spanish Grand Prix contests due to the horrific Le Mans 24 Hour disaster in the prior month. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1954 XLI Grand Prix de l'ACF Gueux, France 1954 XLI Grand Prix de l'ACF At Reims for the French Grand Prix (506.5 kilometers) in July, a German Daimler Benz Mercedes W196 under Juan Manuel Fangio (AR) takes the flag in 2:42:47.9 (average 116.00 mph), under a second (.10) of ahead of a companion Mercedes driven by Karl Kling in finish formation. Fangio, recently drafted by the Mercedes werks, and teammate Kling dice for the race lead for the distance until the team issues hold orders to ensure its maiden Formula 1 victory. Daimler Mercedes triumphs on the Grand Prix circuit for the first time since the 1939 racing season. Photo Credit: Daimler AG.
1953 XL Grand Prix de l'ACF Gueux, France 1953 XL Grand Prix de l'ACF At Reims for the French Grand Prix (501 kilometers) in July, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 500 under Mike Hawthorn (GB) takes the flag in 2:44:18.6 (average 82.57 mph), just five meters ahead of a Maserati driven by Juan Manuel Fangio. Hawthorn and Fangio dice for the lead after the midway point for the distance before Hawthorn prevails on the final corner for victory. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1953 XXIV Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1953 XXIV Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (504 kilometers) in September, an Italian Officine Maserati A6 SSG under Juan Manuel Fangio (AR) notches a victory in 2:49:45.9 (average 110.00 mph), under two seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Alberto Ascari. Fangio and Ascari dice over the distance, and Fangio finally moves to the front after Ascari spins and collides with Onofre Marimon on the final circuit. The resulting pile-up leads to a dangerous setting as the pursuant entries dash for the finish. Mercurial Scuderia founder Enzo Ferrari expresses bitter disappointment over losing at his home circuit and threatens to shut down his werks house for good. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1935 IV RAC British Grand Prix Silverstone, England 1935 IV RAC British Grand Prix At Silverstone for the British Grand Prix (260 miles) in July, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 375 under José Froilán Gonzales (AR) takes the flag in 2:42:18.2 (average 96.11 mph), fifty-one seconds ahead of an ALFA Romeo entry. Gonzales only requires one stop to hold off the fuel-gulping ALFA Romeos and Scuderia Ferrari joyously celebrates its first Formula 1victory as its own make. Photo Credit: GP Library/UIG.
1950 British Grand Prix Silverstone, England 1950 British Grand Prix At Silverstone for the inaugural FIA Formula 1 event, the British Grand Prix (202 miles) in May, the race comes to a 1.5-liter Italian SA ALFA Romeo 158 under Nino Farina (IT) in 2:13:23.6 (average 90.95 mph), under three seconds ahead of a companion ALFA Romeo driven by Luigi Fagioli. After taking on service, Farina moves out front on Lap 32 and speeds away to an unchallenged victory. The English royal family of King George VI, Queen Elizabeth, and Princess Margaret attend the affair along with 200,000 spectators as the first contest in Formula 1 history goes off with little trouble. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
Prix de Monte-Carlo et XI Grand Prix Automobile Monte Carlo Prix de Monte-Carlo et XI Grand Prix Automobile At Monaco for the Grand Prix (318 kilometers) in May, an Italian SA ALFA Romeo 158 under Juan Manual Fangio (AR) takes race honors in 3:13:18.7 (average 61.33 mph), a lap ahead of a Ferrari entry. Lap 1 almost washes away the contest in disaster when a rogue wave from the Mediterranean floods Tabac Corner and causes a stack up of stalled entries, yet Fangio manages to escape the carnage and sprint away for the victory. A British Cooper entry under American Harry Schell stands as the first non-front positioned engine vehicle to compete in a Grand Prix contest since the Auto Unions from the Thirties. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1950 XXI Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1950 XXI Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (504 kilometers) in September, an Italian SA ALFA Romeo under Nino Farina (IT) crosses first in 2:51:17.4 (average 109.70 mph), under seventy-nine seconds ahead of a Ferrari entry. Farina finds a dominating performance for the final race of the season, and the retirement of Juan Manuel Fangio by way of failed gearbox in his Maserati on Lap 23 gifts the racing attorney the inaugural F1 drivers' title by a narrow margin over his Argentine rival. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1948 I RAC International Grand Prix Silverstone, England 1948 I RAC International Grand Prix At Silverstone for the inaugural British Grand Prix (384 kilometers) in October, an Italian Scuderia Ambrosiana Maserati 4CLT/48 under Luigi Villoresi (IT) bests the field in 3:18:03 (average 72.28 mph), fourteen seconds ahead of a companion Maserati driven by Alberto Ascari. Once leading the field two minutes, Villoresi encounters trouble after his second service when his tachometer tumbles out of the dashboard and lodges itself beneath his clutch pedal. Villoresi completes the remaining race without engaging the clutch or monitoring his crankshaft revolutions, yet still manages to hold off hard charging Ascari for a dramatic victory. Britain hosts its first major Grand Prix event since 1927. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1945 I Coupe des Prisonniers Paris, France 1945 I Coupe des Prisonniers At Paris for the first running of a Grand Prix event in the aftermath of World War II, the Coupe de Prisonniers (121.5 kilometers) in September, the race comes to a French Wimille Bugatti T59/50B under Jean-Pierre Wimille (FR) in 1:03:33.3 (average 71.82 mph), eighty-three seconds ahead of a Talbot entry. Starting at the rear of the grid due to his tardiness, Wimille charges through the field and snares a convincing victory as the French in customary fashion again launch motorsport back onto to the global stage. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1939 VIII Grand Prix de Belgique Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1939 VIII Grand Prix de Belgique At Spa-Francorchamps for the Belgian Grand Prix (507.5 kilometers) in June, the race comes to a German Daimler Benz W154 under Hermann Lang (DE) in very rainy conditions in 3:20:21 (average 94.40 mph), under seventeen seconds ahead of an Auto Union driven by Rudolf Hasse. After stopping for service in wake of a Seaman shunt and holding a two minute lead over the field in the wet with two laps remaining, the Mercedes under Lang begins to sputter on track. Lang realizes that his service did not properly fill his tank and gingerly coasts into his pit as Hasse in his Auto Union races into the lead. Lang encounters considerably difficulty in restarting his motor, requiring a downhill coast to engage his clutch and start the firing cycle, yet in remarkable fashion manages to refire his entry and storm back into contention on the final circuit with a thunderous sprint that overtakes Hasse for an impressive victory. The race claims the life of Richard Seaman, arguably the best driver from Great Britain, who perishes after his race leading Mercedes loses traction at Club, skids off circuit, and slams into a stand of trees on Lap 22. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1937 VI Internationales Avusrennen Berlin, Nazi Germany 1937 VI Internationales Avusrennen At Berlin on the enhanced Avus oval for the Avusrennen (155 kilometers, heats + final, non-championship) in May, the race comes to a radically redesigned German Daimler Benz Mercedes W25K-M125 Silver Arrow under Hermann Lang (DE) in 00:35:30.2 (average 167.61 mph), two seconds ahead of an Auto Union driven by Ernst von Delius. Lang dices with Von Delius over the final laps and holds off the latter for a narrow triumph in the swiftest race in Grand Prix history. During the race, German driver and Nazi SS officer Bernd Rosemeyer posts a stunning speed of 171.79 mph in his Auto Union entry. The entries reach remarkable speeds attributable to the new Nordschleife section that features a brow-raising 43 degree banking angle. The 1937 Nazi-subsidized Silver Arrows stand out as beautiful, incredibly swift, and a major step forward in motorsport evolution. Photo Credit: Ullstein Bild. primotipo.com/2016/05/27/avus-rennen-1937/.
1935 VIII Großer Preis von Deutschland Mayen, Nazi Germany 1935 VIII Großer Preis von Deutschland At the Nürburgring for the German Grand Prix (502 kilometers) in July, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari ALFA Romeo Tipo B under Tazio Nuvolari (IT) unexpectedly bests the field in cold and rainy conditions in 4:08:40.2 (average 75.30 mph), under ninety-nine seconds ahead of an Auto Union entry. Nuvolari, piloting an underpowered ALFA Tipo relative to the Mercedes blitz, moves out front after race leader Manfred von Brauchitsch in his Mercedes suffers a blown tire with only nine kilometers remaining. Many enthusiasts regard the surprise Nuvolari-ALFA victory as the greatest auto racing upset ever on German soil. Scuderia honcho Enzo Ferrari originally refuses to race his cars in Nazi Germany despite the objections of driver Nuvolari before Italian Premiere Benito Mussolini takes the side of Nuvolari and overrides the Commendatore. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.grandprixhistory.org/.
1935 VIII Gran Premio d'Italia Monza, Italy 1935 VIII Gran Premio d'Italia At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (503 kilometers) in September, a German Auto Union B under Hans Stuck (DE) crosses first in 3:40:09 (average 85.20 mph), under two minutes ahead of an ALFA Romeo entry. Stuck outlasts the companion entry of Achille Varzi after the latter retires on Lap 15 before eagerly racing away for the first major victory for Auto Union during the 1935 season. The Germans extract sweet revenge for their humiliating defeat at the Nürburgring by ALFA Romeo and Tazio Nuvolari earlier in the season, yet the tifosi surprise all by roundly celebrating Stuck and his performance at the finish. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1934 VI Grand Prix de Monaco Monte Carlo 1934 VI Grand Prix de Monaco At Monaco for the Grand Prix (318 kilometers) in April, the race comes to an Italian Scuderia Ferrari ALFA Romeo Tipo B P3 under Guy Moll (AL) in 3:31:31.4 (average 56.05 mph), sixty-two seconds ahead of a companion ALFA Romeo entry. Moll moves out front after race leader and local Monégasque favorite Louis Chiron in his ALFA Romeo, cruising with a one lap margin over the field, collides with the sandbag barrier at the Loews Hairpin with only two laps remaining, granting Moll a victory in the principality in his maiden Grand Prix career outing. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: monaco-grandsprix.org/.
1933 V Grand Prix de Monaco Monte Carlo 1933 V Grand Prix de Monaco At Monaco for the Grand Prix (318 kilometers) in April, the race comes to a French Bugatti T51 under Achille Varzi (IT) in 3:27:49.4 (average 57.04 mph), two minutes ahead of an ALFA Romeo entry. Varzi and Tazio Nuvolari in his ALFA Romeo dice over the closing miles before Nuvolari loses drive on the downhill run from the Casino on the final lap. Photo Credit: Archivos M. Hughes, C. Moity, Foundation Prestige Bugatti.
1933 XIX Grand Prix de L'Automobile Club de France Montlhéry, France 1933 XIX Grand Prix de L'Automobile Club de France At Montlhéry for the French Grand Prix (500 kilometers) in June, an Italian Campari Maserati 8C 3000 under Giuseppe Campari (IT) takes race honors in 3:48:45.4 (average 81.49 mph), fifty-two seconds ahead of an ALFA Romeo entry. Campari moves out front after passing race leader Philippe Étancelin in his ALFA Romeo, ailing with gearbox troubles, on the final circuit. Photo Credit: Le Miroir des sports, 13 juin 1933.
1933 VII Gran Premio di Tripoli Tripoli, Italian Tripolitania 1933 VII Gran Premio di Tripoli At Tripoli for the Grand Prix (394 kilometers, non-championship) in May, a French Bugatti T51 under Achille Varzi (IT) takes race honors in 2:19:51.4 (average 104.80 mph), under a second (.20) ahead of an ALFA Romeo driven by Tazio Nuvolari. Nuvolari runs down race leader Varzi after the former makes a stop at mid-race, and both dice side-by-side for the lead until the final circuit when Varzi makes his car wide on the final corner and holds off his longtime rival for a dramatic victory. The race stands tainted in motorsport history due to a pre-race arrangement between race organizers and drivers Nuvolari, Varzi, and Baconin Borzacchini where the organizers plan to sell lottery tickets to enthusiasts aiming to cash in on the top three placing entries, and how all six people will share the cash pool if one of the selected drivers wins the event. Photo Credit:
1933 VI Gran Premio di Monza Monza, Italy 1933 VI Gran Premio di Monza At Monza for the Grand Prix (99 kilometers, heats plus final, non-championship) in September, a French Lehoux Bugatti T51 under Marcel Lehoux (FR) crosses first in 00:21:17 (average 110.40 mph), under four seconds ahead of an ALFA Romeo driven by Guy Moll. The tragic afternoon begins during Heat 2 when race leader Giuseppe Campari in his ALFA Romeo overcorrects a driving error at the South Curve and soars over the concrete barrier into a barranca. In the same instant Baconin Borzacchini in his Maserati swerves to avoid contact with Campari, loses control, and also careens over the same wall. Both reputed drivers perish in the horrific incident. After a lengthy delay to clear the carnage, race officials launch Heat 3 and the Final only to their horror to learn that race leader Count Stanislaus Czaykowski in his Bugatti on Lap 8 skids, flips, and rockets over the barrier at the South Curve in virtually the same location that claims Campari and Borzacchini. Grief stricken race officials halt the event six laps later, and the angry recriminations afterwards regarding circuit safety, specifically the shallow banking angles on the circuit, forever dubs the event as the 'Black Day of Monza'. Photo Credit: Autodromo Nazionale Monza. Cesare Gobbo, 1933.
1932 ADAC Avusrennen Berlin, Weimar Republic 1932 ADAC Avusrennen At Berlin on the ever swift Avus oval for the ADAC Avusrennen (294 kilometers, non-championship) in May, a 7.1-liter German Mercedes SSKL under Manfred von Brauchitsch (DE) takes race honors in 1:30:52.4 (average 120.79 mph), under four seconds ahead of an ALFA Romeo driven by Rudy Caracciola. Von Brauchitsch moves out front on the final lap with an unexpected pass of race leader Caracciola on the straight just past the South Loop. Mercedes debuts its radical streamlined bullet design racers with considerable fanfare before the German crowd. The race claims the life of Czech Prince George Lobkowicz, who perishes in a rollover shunt on the opening lap. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.classiccarcatalogue.com/.
1930 VI Reale Premio di Roma Rome, Italy 1930 VI Reale Premio di Roma At Rome for the Grand Prix (261 kilometers, non-championship) in May, an Italian Maserati 26M under Luigi Arcangeli (IT) takes the flag in 1:56.37.8 (average 86.7 mph), under two seconds ahead of a Bugatti driven by Louis Chiron and Guy Bouriat. Chiron, after taking over driving duties from Bouriat, charges hard to overcome a nearly minute deficit to race leader Arcangeli with two laps to go. In thrilling fashion, Chiron moves ahead of Arcangeli at Turn 1 on the final circuit before the latter returns the favor with an outside pass on the final corner and sprints away for a narrow victory with his new factory Maserati. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1930 III Gran Premio di Monza Monza, Italy 1930 III Gran Premio di Monza At Monza for the Grand Prix (240.5 kilometers, non-championship) in September, an Italian Maserati 26M under Achille Varzi (IT) crosses first in 1:35:46.2, less than a second (.20) ahead of a companion Maserati under Luigi Arcangeli. Varzi, again after executing a fabulous charge through the field after a slow service, moves out front on the final lap with a pass of race leader Arcangeli mere meters from the finish. The tifosi joyously storm the circuit, creating perilous obstacles for the remaining finishers, as runner-up Arcangeli breaks down in tears. Photo Credit: Gallica Digital Library.
1930 I Masarykuv Okruh Brno, Czechoslovak Republic 1930 I Masarykuv Okruh At Brno for the inaugural Masaryk Circuit event (495.5 kilometers, non-championship) in September, a German Bugatti T35C under Prinz Hermann zu Leiningen (DE) and Heinrich-Joachim von Morgen (DE) wins in 4:54:13.6, under three minutes ahead of a companion Bugatti driven by Ernst Günter Burggaller. In an utterly another heart stopping Grand Prix finish, von Morgen moves out front on the final lap after race leader Tazio Nuvolari, racing with an open hood plate due to overheating issues with his ALFA Romeo, loses drive and stops only nine kilometers from the finish. The ALFA works retires the legendary P2 after the contest. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1929 I Grand Prix de Monaco Monte Carlo 1929 I Grand Prix de Monaco At Monte Carlo for the inaugural Monaco Grand Prix (318 kilometers, non-championship) in April, the race comes to a French Williams Bugatti T35B under William Grover-Williams (GB) in 3:56:11 (average 50.19 mph), under seventy-eight seconds ahead of a Bugatti entry. The legendary big block 7.1 German Mercedes SSK entry of Rudy Caracciola proves no match for the more nimble Bugatti entries upon the streets of the principality and the motorsport community, stunned by the glamour of Monte Carlo for the first time, gets a glimpse into its not-too-distant future. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.historicracing.com/.
1928 Gran Premio D'Europa Monza, Italy 1928 Gran Premio D'Europa At Monza for the Italian Grand Prix (600 kilometers) in September, the race comes to a French Bugatti T35C under Louis Chiron (MC) in 3:45:08.6 (average 99.36 mph), under two and a half minutes ahead of an ALFA Romeo entry. On Lap 18, Emilio Materassi in his Talbot collides with a back marker, overturns, and launches airborne into the crowded main grandstand. The horrific shunt claims twenty-three lives, including Materassi, and the race stands as the grimmest motorsport disaster to date. As race officials remove the corpses from the grandstand and Talbot withdraws from the event, the race inexplicably continues with Chiron moving out front with a pass of race leader Achille Varzi in his ALFA Romeo on Lap 20. Italian authorities cancel the Grand Prix event over the next few seasons to implement safety measures at the dangerous yet beloved circuit. Photo Credit:
1927 Grand Prix de Provence Miramas, France 1927 Grand Prix de Provence At Miramas, France for the Provence Grand Prix (300 kilometers, non-championship) in March, a French Société Nerka Bugatti T35B under Louis Chiron (MC) takes race honors in rainy conditions in 0:12:28.0 (average 74.8 mph), fourteen seconds ahead of an Amilcar driven by André Morel. Heavy morning rains doom the long delayed event from the start and matters degrade even further after Robert Benoist in his Delage crashes into a pair of entries upon his approach to the grid after his formation lap. The French Talbot team withdraws from the contest out of frustration, angering the partisan crowd, and bedlam ensues on Lap 5 after spectators storm the circuit as a protest against the delays. The Talbot withdrawal and the inability of race organizers to provide current updates on event circumstances only provokes greater wrath in the aftermath as hooligans damage the French Talbot entries before setting the service garages aflame. Photo Credit:
XV Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France Le Mans, France XV Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France At Le Mans for the renewal of the French Grand Prix (518 kilometers) in July, the race unexpectedly comes to an American Duesenberg under Jimmy Murphy (US) in 4:07:11.4 (average 78.50 mph), under fifteen minutes ahead of a Ballot entry. An American entry, fully benefitting from valuable automotive development during the war years, triumphs in a major European Grand Prix event only for the second time in motorsport history. The French audience stands dumfounded and unamused, refuses to applaud for the American Murphy at the finish, and race officials elect to instead fete Goux at the postrace dinner. French antipathy towards the Germans prompts race officials to ban all Mercedes entries from the event. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.motorsport.com.
1914 Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France Lyon, France 1914 Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France At Lyon for the French Grand Prix (752.5 kilometers) in July, a German DMG Mercedes 18/100 under Christian Lautenschlager (DE) takes race honors in 7:08:18.4 (average 65.67 mph), a minute and a half ahead of a companion Mercedes entry. In an epic Franco-Teuton auto battle that eerily foreshadows the events to come across Europe, Lautenschlager moves out front after race leader Georges Boillot in his Peugeot loses drive with only two laps remaining. Mercedes sweeps the top three race positions and crushes rival Peugeot in a milestone meeting that draws over 300,000 spectators. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.grandprixhistory.org/.
1912 American Grand Prize Cup Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 1912 American Grand Prize Cup The American Automobile Association (AAA) relocates the American Grand Prize Cup contest (410 miles) from Savannah, Georgia to Wisconsin in October and an Italian FIAT unexpectedly takes race honors under gentleman racer Caleb Bragg (US) in 5:59:25 (average 69.3 mph), over fifteen minutes ahead of a Benz entry. Bragg and Ralph De Palma in his Mercedes wage a tight battle over the closing miles before De Palma accidentally runs into the rear of race leader Bragg on the final lap. The shunt delivers De Palma into a ditch as Bragg races to victory and De Palma goes to the hospital with serious injuries. The race claims the life of two-time Savannah winner David Bruce-Brown, who perishes in a tragic practice shunt. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: Archivo "AutoRama" de www.forum-auto.com. pilotos-muertos.com/.
1906 Grand Prix de l'ACF Le Mans, France 1906 Grand Prix de l'ACF At Le Mans, France for the inaugural National Grand Prix (six laps per day, overall 1238.5 kilometers) in June, a 100 horsepower French Renault AK under Ferenc Szisz (HU) takes the flag in 12:03:57.6 (average 63.8 mph), thirty-two seconds ahead of a FIAT entry. The contest marks a milestone moment in global motorsport as the ACF organizers host the first Grand Prix event under a predetermined technical formula on the pre-modern Sarthe circuit as a successor to the Bennett Gordon and Vanderbilt Cup racing ventures. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: 8w.forix.com/.
1903 Paris-Madrid Grand Prix Madrid, Spain 1903 Paris-Madrid Grand Prix At Madrid for the Paris-Madrid race (1014 kilometers, four days) in May, the race comes to a French Mors Z under Fernand Gabriel (FR) in 5:14:31.2 (average 40.58 mph), over fifteen minutes ahead of a Renault entry. Day 1 results in abject disaster as the unmarshaled contest claims six lives and leaves reputed French automobile manufacturer Marcel Renault clinging for his life in critical condition after a high-speed shunt into a ditch. The shattering events prompts French premier Émile Combes to bar any future running of the event over French territory, and the Spanish government immediately responds in like kind. Despite the carnage, race observers take note that French driver Louis Renault attains an unofficial record top speed of 88.75 miles per hour along the route in his thirty-horsepower eponymous entry before officials red flag the contest. In a first for motorsport, race officials establish the concept of a protected 'parc ferme' area to prohibit entrants from working upon their racing entries overnight in between the stages. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1894 I Paris-Rouen Grand Prix Rouen, France 1894 I Paris-Rouen Grand Prix At Rouen, France for the Paris-Rouen race (127 kilometers) in July, the race comes to a French De Dion Steam Wagon under the Comte Jules Albert de Dion (FR) in 6:48:00 (hours:minutes:seconds, average 11.6 mph), three and a half minutes ahead of a Peugeot entry. The race, largely run over unpaved roads and surfaces, stands out as perhaps the first motorsport endeavor designed to compare the relative fitness and performance among automobile manufacturers and their products. Of immediate import stands the runner-up French Peugeot Daimler Type 5 under Albert Lemaítre, which wins the automobile internal combustion classification in 6:51:30. Despite the superior speed and endurance of the Steam Wagon, many minds in the engineering community already foresee the limitations of steam propulsion for practical motoring in the automotive future. Photo Credit: Public Domain.