Welcome to nicheforSpeed.com

Current Motorsport Status and History including Formula 1 (F1), World Endurance and GT (WEC, IMSA, Weathertech), IndyCar (NTT), and NASCAR (Monster Cup) racing. Please explore and enjoy your niche for speed.

Endurance All Time Memorable Races


2018 LXXXVI Le Mans 24 HoursLe Mans, France 2018 LXXXVI Le Mans 24 HoursAt Le Mans for the 24 Hours in June, a Japanese Toyota Gazoo TS050 Hybrid under Fernando Alonso (ES), Sébastien Buemi (CH), and Kazuki Nakajima (JP) crosses first and covers 5286.36 kilometers (average 136.76 mph), two laps ahead of a companion Toyota entry. The #7 and #8 Toyota Hybrid entries dice at the point for the first half of the contest before the #8 racer beneath Alonso asserts control in the sixteenth hour and prevails at the finish with Nakajima at the wheel for the first victory for Toyota after twenty, some absolutely heartbreaking, attempts. Photo Credit: Toyota Gazoo Racing.
2019 LXXXVII Le Mans 24 HoursLe Mans, France 2019 LXXXVII Le Mans 24 HoursAt Le Mans for the 24 Hours in June, a Japanese Toyota Gazoo TS050 Hybrid under Fernando Alonso (ES), Sébastien Buemi (CH), and Kazuki Nakajima (JP) wins and covers 5245.25 kilometers (average 135.83 mph), under seventeen seconds ahead of a companion Toyota driven by Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi, and José María López. The #7 and #8 Toyota Hybrids dice at the front throughout Saturday evening before the #7 beneath Conway and Kobayashi assumes control of the race after a midrace service near the halfway point. The #7 builds a small yet manageable lead on Sunday morning before the typical Toyota Le Mans horror strikes during the twenty-third hour when an onboard sensor indicates a deflating tire. A stop for service by pilot López uncovers no problems, yet upon return the sensor again indicates deflation, and out of a concern for safety, the #7 yields the lead to its companion #8 driven by Nakajima, who motors the entry home for a second consecutive cross at the Sarthe for both Toyota and the winning driver set. Despite the jubilation over the win in the garage, Toyota gently consoles its second running team for missing its chance for glory not through a lack of skill and determination, but rather for a faulty sensor. Photo Credit: Bob van der Wolf.
2017 6 Hours Silverstone Silverstone, England 2017 6 Hours Silverstone At Silverstone for the 6 Hour in April, the race comes to a Japanese Toyota Gazoo TS050 Hybrid under Anthony Davidson (GB), Sébastien Buemi (CH), and Kazuki Nakajima (JP) in rainy conditions that covers 1162.49 kilometers (average 120.24 mph), under seven seconds ahead of a Porsche driven by Timo Bernhard, Earl Bamber, and Brendon Hartley. The Porsche 919 Hybrid leads throughout the afternoon until the Toyotas close in with less than an hour remaining. Hartley in the Porsche beats all out of final service, yet Buemi in a stirring drive swiftly closes on Hartley and pushes his Toyota past the Porsche at the Loop with less than ten minutes remaining for a slender and dramatic victory. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
2017 LXXXV Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2017 LXXXV Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a German Porsche 919 Hybrid under Timo Bernhard (DE), Brendon Hartley (NZ), and Earl Bamber (NZ) takes race honors and covers 5001.23 kilometers (average 129.37 mph), one lap ahead of an LMP2 ORECA driven by Tung Ho-Pin (CN), Thomas Laurent (FR), and Oliver Jarvis (GB). In yet another French classic the Toyota Hybrids make off free and fast over the other makes during the early stages before mechanicals strike the #8 entry in the fifth hour and the companion #7 next in the tenth. The long morning sojourn ultimately promotes the #1 Porsche into a seemingly safe lead before misfortune takes another bite, sending the latter back to the garage during the twenty-first hour. To the surprise of all, the LMP2-classified Jackie Chan ORECA beneath Laurent suddenly glides from the fog and takes the point, the first time a second-tier prototype leads the field in event history. Many enthusiasts attempt to will the Chan entry home, yet the #2 Porsche driven by Bernhard, running on superior rubber, tracks down and passes Laurent with only two hours remaining before sailing to victory for the third consecutive season at the Sarthe. Bamber and Bernhard each win for the second time, with Bernhard taking the honors for the first time since 2010. LMP2 entries take placings two through six in an impressive showing against their speedier cousins. Photo Credit: Nikolaz Godet.
2016 LXXXIV Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2016 LXXXIV Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hours in June, a German Porsche 919 Hybrid under Marc Lieb (DE), Romain Dumas (FR), and Neel Jani (CH) takes race honors and covers 5233.75 kilometers (average 135.46 mph), three laps ahead of a Toyota entry. In a summer run for the annals, a three-way hybrid battle between Porsche, Audi, and Toyota erupts from the green flag and the manufacturers tussle well through the night and into the small hours before Audi gives up the ghost under the tremendous pace. Porsche and Toyota continue onwards until the #5 and #6 entries of Toyota assert control at the point in the eighteenth hour. Cracks appears in the Japanese steel in the twenty-first hour when the #6 Toyota entry beneath Kamui Kobayashi takes on service to repair its door panel, leaving the #5 companion driven by Kazuki Nakajima alone to fend off the arms-length yet relentless challenge from the Porsche driven by Jani. With six minutes remaining in the contest, the Toyota garage gasps in horror as its #5 entry, leading Porsche by over seventy seconds, suddenly coughs with a suspected failing turbocharger. Toyota, recalling 1998 and its doomed GT-One entry marooned at Arnage in the closing hours, holds it breath and prays for a miracle limp to the flag, yet only three minutes pass before the #5 pulls over on the front straight just past the finish line with total loss of drive, its weekend effort over in a disappointing drift of smoke. Porsche sprints past wounded Toyota and gleefully gallops to another surprise triumph in the 24 for the second consecutive season, a stunning cross that again establishes the make as the all-time leader in the event with lucky trophy number thirteen. Toyota team principal and legend Hughes de Chaunac descends into tears as his team, utterly crushed by the defeat, suffers another inconsolable disappointment at the Sarthe. Winning driver Dumas prevails for the second time and first since the 2010 season. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
2015 6 Hours of Silverstone Silverstone, England 2015 6 Hours of Silverstone At Silverstone for the 6 Hour in April, the race comes to a German Audi R18 e-tron quattro under André Lotterer (DE), Marcel Fässler (CH), and Benoît Tréluyer (FR) that covers 1186.1 kilometers (average 122.66 mph), under five seconds ahead of a Porsche driven by Marc Lieb, Romain Dumas, and Neel Jani. The Porsche 919 Hybrids begin failing in the second hour, yet a determined #18 entry beneath Jani stays in the fight and exchanges the point with the lead #7 Audi driven by Fässler deep into the final hour until the Porsche stops for final service. Fässler survives both a late stop-and-go penalty and a final thrust by the Porsche and Jani before taking a much deserved cross in the season opener. Photo Credit: Sven Kester.
2014 LXXXII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2014 LXXXII Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hours in June, the race comes to a German Audi R18 e-tron quattro under André Lotterer (DE), Marcel Fässler (CH), and Benoît Tréluyer (FR) in rainy conditions that covers 5165.67 kilometers (average 133.62 mph), three laps ahead of a companion Audi entry. The Toyotas break out early and fast, enduring into the night and the small hours before suffering power unit mechanicals in the fourteenth hour, allowing the Audi hybrid oil burners to assume control. The Audis seemingly holds matters in hand until turbocharger mechanicals force the R18 entries into service and thus allowing the newly minted Porsche 919 Hybrid entries back into the contention in the twenty-first hour. Misfortune shortly thereafter falls upon the Porsche werks as power unit mechanicals terminate the 919 attempt, and the repaired Audis recover in time to savor a delightful victory at the Sarthe. The Audi werks and Team Jöst collect their respective twelfth wins in the LM24, supplanting the Porsche werks as the all-time event leader, while Lotterer, Fässler, and Tréluyer each join the championship elite with their third consecutive crosses. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
2013 6 Hours of Silverstone Silverstone, England 2013 6 Hours of Silverstone At Silverstone for the WEC 6 Hours opener in April, the race comes to a German Audi R18 e-tron quattro under Allan McNish (GB), Tom Kristensen (DK), and Loïc Duval (FR) that covers 1160.33 kilometers (average 120.17 mph), under four seconds ahead of a companion Audi driven by André Lotterer, Marcel Fässler, and Benoît Tréluyer. In a thrilling finish, McNish takes over the #2 Audi in the final stint twenty-six seconds behind the companion #1 Audi driven by Tréluyer, who elects to skip final service, and executes a brilliant drive that overtakes the struggling Tréluyer with only four and a half minutes remaining. Photo Credit: James Holland.
2012 LXXX Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2012 LXXX Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a German Audi Jöst Audi R18 e-tron quattro hybrid diesel under André Lotterer (DE), Marcel Fässler (CH), and Benoît Tréluyer (FR) takes race honors in light rains and covers 5151.8 kilometers (average 133.26 mph), one lap ahead of a companion Audi driven by Allan McNish, Rinaldo Capello, and Tom Kristensen. The Audis Hybrids and Toyota dice for the lead through Saturday evening and Sunday morning until the Toyota Hybrid loses drive in the eleventh hour and the contending #2 Audi beneath McNish crashes in the twenty-second hour, allowing the #1 Audi to breathe a sigh of relief and coast to the finish. Audi and its driver set wins for the second consecutive season with a hybrid diesel AWD entry, a first for the LM24, while Team Jöst triumphs for the tenth time at the Sarthe. Photo Credit: Virtual Motorpix.
2011 LXXIX Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2011 LXXIX Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, the race comes to a German Audi Jöst R18 TDI under Marcel Fässler (CH), André Lotterer (DE), and Benoît Tréluyer (FR) in rainy conditions that covers 4838.3 kilometers (average 125.06 mph), under fourteen seconds ahead of a Peugeot driven by Sébastien Bourdais, Simon Pagenaud, and Pedro Lamy. The Audis, running better on rubber than fuel economy, out leapfrog the Peugeots by way of service stops throughout the contest before holding on for a slender victory. Team Jöst ruins a fabulous season to date for Peugeot, triumphs at the Sarthe for the ninth time overall, and takes its first cross since the 2006 season. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
2008 1000 KM Monza Monza, Italy 2008 1000 KM Monza At Monza for the 1000 Kilometer in April, the race comes to a French Peugeot 908 HDi FAP under Stéphane Sarrazin (FR) and Pedro Lamy (PT) in 4:59:07.9 (average 124.91 mph), under forty-eight seconds ahead of an Audi driven by Alexandre Prémat and Mike Rockenfeller. Losing its lead position to the field after missing a service call during a caution condition, the #8 Peugeot beneath Lamy moves back out front after executing a wheel-banging pass of the race leading #2 Audi driven by Rockenfeller at the first chicane with only four laps remaining. Lamy receives a stop-and-go penalty for his aggressive pass, yet Rockenfeller must stop to repair a left front puncture from the incident, leaving enough time for the Peugeot to take the day. The race features a spectacular midair flipover by Stéphane Ortelli in his Courage ORECA at Lap 130. Photo Credit: Sutton Images.
2008 LXXVI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2008 LXXVI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour (non-championship) in June, a German Audi North America Audi R10 TDI under Allan McNish (GB), Rinaldo Capello (IT), and Tom Kristensen (DN) takes race honors in rainy conditions and covers 5265.9 kilometers (average 134.40 mph), nearly four and a half minutes ahead of a Peugeot driven by Nicolas Minassian, Marc Gené, and Jacques Villeneuve. The #2 Audi R10 oil burner, running on a 10% biofuel formulation for the first time, proves out better in the early morning rain and finally moves out front past the unstable Peugeots at 5 AM before holding off a hard charging Minassian on a drying circuit for victory. The Audi werks wins at the Sarthe for the third consecutive season and seventh time overall, Kristensen crosses for an impressive eighth time, Capello for the third, and McNish prevails for the second time and first since the 1998 season. Photo Credit: Tom Haapanen.
2006 LXXIV Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 2006 LXXIV Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour (non-championship) in June, the race comes to a German Audi Jöst Audi R10 RDI under Frank Biela (DE), Marco Werner (DE), and Emanuele Pirro (IT) in rainy conditions that covers a record 5187 kilometers (average 133.85 mph), four laps ahead of a Pescarolo entry. The #8 Audi moves out front in the fourth hour after its companion #7 entry requires service to replace its fuel injectors, and the former makes use of a splendid combination of superior speed and fuel economy to run away from the field for a comfortable victory. The awe-inspiring Jöst Audi R10 TDI, prepared for racing in only 200 days, stands as the first diesel-powered victor at the Sarthe as Jöst takes the laurels for the eighth time (only topped by the Porsche werks), Biela and Pirro each collect their fourth crosses, and Werner prevails for the second consecutive season. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1999 LXVII Le Mans 24 Hour Le Mans, France 1999 LXVII Le Mans 24 Hour At Le Mans for the 24 Hour (non-championship) in June, the race comes to a German BMW V12 LMR under Joachim Winkelhock (DE), Pierluigi Martini (IT), and Yannick Dalmas (FR) that covers 4968 kilometers (average 128.62 mph), one lap ahead of a Toyota driven by Ukyo Katayama, Keiichi Tsuchiya, and Toshio Suzuki. The race leading BMW prototype and the Toyota GT-One dice at the front throughout the affair until the BMW builds a slight lead on Sunday morning. The Toyota under Katayama pulls out the stops and tracks down the leading BMW until a blown tire ends the thrilling chase with only an hour remaining. The BMW werks earns its maiden victory at the Sarthe and Dalmas wins the prestigious contest for the fourth time, yet the event remains most memorable resulting from three spectacular airborne somersault incidents befalling the sleek Mercedes CLR entries. Mercedes promptly pulls down its service doors after the final flight and quietly withdraws from the event. Photo Credit: Frédéric Le Floc'h.
1998 LXVI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1998 LXVI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, the race comes to a German Porsche 911 GT1-98 under Laurent Aïello (FR), Allan McNish (GB), and Stéphane Ortelli (MC) that covers 4783.8 kilometers (average 123.85 mph), one lap ahead of a companion Porsche driven by Jörg Müller, Uwe Alzen, and Bob Wollek. After heavily touted Mercedes and its CLK GTR LM entries withdraw in frustration due to engine gremlins out on the swift circuit, the sensational Toyota GT-One emerges as the only entry prepared to directly take on the elegant Porsche prototypes. The relentless Japanese challenge puts the GT-One out front by early Sunday morning and things seemingly appear in place until the entry in dramatic fashion unexpectedly succumbs at Arnage Corner with gearbox failure only two hours from the finish. Porsche AG and its enthusiasts all over the globe joyously celebrate its eleventh werks victory at the Sarthe. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1997 LXVI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1997 LXVI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour (non-championship) in June, the race comes to a German Jöst TWR WSC 95 Porsche under Michele Alboreto (IT), Stefan Johansson (SE), and Tom Kristensen (DN) that covers 4909.6 kilometers (average 128.62 mph), a lap ahead of a McLaren driven by Jean-Marc Gounon, Pierre-Henri Raphanel, and Anders Oloffson. The Jöst TWR entry moves out front on Sunday afternoon after the race leading werks Porsche 911 GT1 inexplicably goes aflame and sensationally burns to the ground on Mulsanne in the twenty-second hour. Constructor Jöst Racing with the Walkinshaw chassis wins at the Sarthe for the second consecutive season and fourth time overall. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1995 LXIII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1995 LXIII Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, the race unexpectedly comes to a GTR-class Japanese Kokusai Kaihatsu McLaren BMW F1 GTR under Yannick Dalmas (FR), Masanori Sekiya (JP), and J.J. Lehto (FI) in heavy rains that covers 4055.8 kilometers (average 105.01 mph), a lap ahead of a Courage driven by Bob Wollek, Éric Hélary, and Mario Andretti. The underrated Kokusai McLaren, surprisingly outpacing the purportedly swifter WSC prototypes over the distance, moves out front after the race leading Price Racing McLaren suffers misfortune and drops a transmission in the twenty-third hour. Dalmas wins the event for the second consecutive season and third time overall. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1994 LXII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1994 LXII Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, the race comes to a German Porsche Dauer 962 LM under Yannick Dalmas (FR), Hurley Haywood (US), and Mauro Baldi (IT) that covers 4678.4 kilometers (average 121.32 mph), a lap ahead of a Toyota under Eddie Irvine, Mauro Martini, and Jeff Krosnoff. The Dauer Porsche moves out front after the race leading Toyota suffers broken gear linkage with only ninety minutes remaining. Haywood wins the event for the third time and first since 1983 and Dalmas earns his second cross in three seasons as the Porsche werks earns its unprecedented tenth triumph at the Sarthe and first since 1987. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1992 XLIV Spa 24 Hours Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1992 XLIV Spa 24 Hours At Spa for the 24 Hours (non-championship) in August, an Italian Bigazzi BMW M3 Sport Evo under Steve Soper (GB), Christian Danner (DE), and Jean-Michel Martin (BE) notches a victory in very warm and rainy conditions that covers 3559.71 kilometers (average 92.73 mph), forty-eight seconds ahead of a Schnitzer BMW driven by Altfrid Heger, Eric van de Poele, and Jochim Winkelhock. After a night of frustrating attrition among the contending BMW entries, the race leading Schnitzer BMW loses a driveshaft in the twenty-second hour and stops for service, allowing the Bigazzi BMW to make up its two lap deficit and join the Schnitzer entry on the same lap. Another round of service leaves the Schnitzer BMW still in the lead, yet the latter team orders Van de Poele to slow his pace so its entry may reach the finish. With just over ten minutes remaining in the contest, Soper in the Bigazzi entry closes up on Van de Poele, shoves the latter aside at the Bus Stop chicane, and scoots away for a highly dramatic victory at the Spa circuit. Photo Credit: BMW.
1989 XLI Spa 24 Hours Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1989 XLI Spa 24 Hours At Spa for the 24 Hours (non-championship) in July, a Swiss Eggenberger Ford Sierra RS500 Cosworth under Gianfranco Brancatelli (IT), Bernd Schneider (DE), and Win Percy (GB) takes race honors in rainy conditions and covers 3337.66 kilometers (average speed unascertained), eight laps ahead of a BMW entry. After the race leading Bigazzi BMW M3 crashes out in the nineteenth hour, the Eggenberger Sierra entry finally moves out front after the succeeding race leading Schnitzer BMW M3 fails to restart after service with only two hours remaining. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1988 LVI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1988 LVI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, the race comes to a British Walkinshaw Jaguar XJR-9 under Jan Lammers (NL), Johnny Dumfries (GB), and Andy Wallace (GB) that covers 5332.97 kilometers (average 137.79 mph), under three minutes ahead of a Porsche driven by Klaus Ludwig, Hans-Jochim Stuck, and Derek Bell. Jaguar and the werks Porsche 962s dice for the lead early in the contest before Porsche makes a critical calculation error that causes Ludwig to exhaust his fuel supply while on the circuit, allowing Jaguar to scamper away. Porsche desperately attempts to overcome its error through the night and early morning hours, yet Jaguar continues to lead until the entry develops gearbox gremlins in the final hour. Lammers runs the XJR-9 solely in fourth gear for the remaining distance and British fans deliriously cheer as Jaguar takes the checkers, the first for the marque since 1957 as the Leaping Cat also breaks the seven-year stranglehold by Porsche over the Sarthe. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1983 LI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1983 LI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, the race comes to a German Porsche 956 under Vern Schuppan (AU), Al Holbert (US), and Hurley Haywood (US) that covers 5047.93 kilometers (average 130.69 mph), sixty-four seconds ahead of a companion Porsche driven by Jacky Ickx and Derek Bell. The werks Porsche #3 runs well until late Sunday afternoon after a missing door, overheating, and an on-track stall befalls the entry in the final hour. The werks Porsche #1 under Bell presses forward with a final charge, yet the race expires as Holbert limps across the wire for victory. Haywood wins for the second time at the Sarthe (first since 1977), while Schuppan becomes the first Australian victor since the 1924 initial running with Bernard Rubin and Bentley. Photo Credit: Porsche AG.
1978 XXX Spa 24 Hours Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1978 XXX Spa 24 Hours At Spa for the thirtieth running of the 24 Hours (non-championship) in July, a Belgium Belga Ford Capri III under Gordon Spice (GB) and Ted Pilette (BE) takes the flag and covers 4315 kilometers (average 111.73 mph), four kilometers ahead of a BMW driven by Dirk Vermeersch, Raymond von Hove, and Eddy Joosen. The race leading Belga Capri seemingly holds matters in hand until a failed radiator forces the entry into service near 1130 AM on Sunday morning. The Juma BMW under Vermeersch assumes the lead and streaks for the finish, yet the repaired Belga Capri under Spice returns to the circuit and impressively runs down the race leading BMW for victory with only thirty minutes to spare. Photo Credit: Ford Motor Company.
1973 XLI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1973 XLI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a French Equipe Matra Simca MS670B under Henri Pescarolo (FR) and Gérard Larrousse (FR) takes the flag in rainy conditions and covers 4853.95 kilometers (average 125.67 mph), six laps ahead of a Ferrari entry. Ferrari and Matra survive the night and dice all Sunday morning until the former loses drive with only ninety minutes remaining. Matra wins at the Sarthe for the second consecutive season and enjoys the double treat of besting Scuderia Ferrari on home soil. A French Ferrari 365 GTB/4 driven by Claude Ballot-Léna (FR) and Vic Elford (US) wins the GT competition ahead of a Porsche driven by Paul Keller, Erwin Kremer, and Clemens Schickentanz that finishes on the same lap. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1971 VI Daytona 24 Hours Daytona Beach, Florida 1971 VI Daytona 24 Hours At Daytona for the 24 Hour in January, the race comes to a British Wyer Automotive Porsche 917K under Pedro Rodríguez (MX) and Jackie Oliver (GB) that covers 2621.28 miles (average 109.23 mph), a lap ahead of a Ferrari driven by Ronnie Bucknum and Tony Adamowicz. Rodríguez leads the Ferrari contingent by a large margin through the night before suffering a broken gearbox on late Sunday morning that costs over ninety minutes in service. Rodríguez, two laps down upon return, chases down the lead Ferrari with only 45 minutes remaining, wins at the Beach for the second consecutive season, and ascends as the all-time victory leader in the event. A DeLorenzo Chevrolet Corvette under Tony DeLorenzo (US) and Don Yenko (US) captures the GT competition by thirty-two laps ahead of a Corvette entry. Photo Credit: Louis Galanos.
1970 XIX Sebring 12 Hours Sebring, Florida 1970 XIX Sebring 12 Hours At Sebring for the 12 Hour in March, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 512S under Ignazio Giunti (IT), Nino Vaccarella (IT), and Mario Andretti (US) takes race honors and covers 1289.59 miles (average 107.29 mph), twenty-two seconds ahead of a Porsche driven by Peter Revson and reputed actor Steve McQueen. Just 77 minutes before the finish, Andretti in the lead Ferrari drops a gearbox, prompting his team to move him to the third-place running entry piloted by Giunti and Vaccarella. The skilled American moves back out front forty-seven minutes later after passing Revson for second place just as the leading Wyer Porsche driven by Pedro Rodríguez falters with broken wheel studs in the closing minutes. Andretti boldly stops on the final lap for fuel before again overtaking Revson for an impressive victory. Scuderia Ferrari wins at the airbase circuit for the first time since the 1964 season, while Andretti crosses for the second time. A DeLorenzo Chevrolet Corvette under Tony Lorenzo (US) and Dick Lang (US) wins the GT competition by five laps ahead of a Corvette entry. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1970 XXXVIII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1970 XXXVIII Le Mans 24 Hours At a very wet Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, an Austrian Salzburg Porsche 917K under Hans Hermann (DE) and Richard Attwood (GB) notches a victory and covers 4607.81 kilometers (average speed 119.29 mph), five laps ahead of a Porsche 917L entry. Hermann moves out front at the halfway point after the Ferraris falter and pushes his 917 through the inclement weather for a much anticipated victory. Porsche finally triumphs at the Sarthe after twenty attempts as the German marque avenges Hermann’s narrow defeat to the mighty Fords on the prior season. A French Etablissement Sonauto Porsche 914/6 under Claude Ballot-Léna (FR) and Guy Chausseil (FR) wins the GT competition by three laps over a Porsche entry. On-car cameras placed upon a Porsche driven by Herbert Linge captures racing footage for Steve McQueen’s in-production Le Mans feature length film. A track official tragically loses his life in the tenth hour after struck during a spinout shunt involving Jacky Ickx at the Ford Chicane. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1969 IV Daytona 24 Hours Daytona Beach, Florida 1969 IV Daytona 24 Hours At Daytona for the 24 Hour in February, the race comes to an American Penske Lola T70 Mk III Chevrolet under Mark Donohue (US) and Chuck Parsons (US) that covers 2385.06 miles (average 99.27 mph), thirty laps ahead of a Lola entry. The Penske Lola suffers a host of problems from the onset, including issues with fuel pickup and a broken exhaust, and falls behind by nearly fifty laps by 3 AM in the morning. Fortune thereafter smiles upon the Penske entry as the other competitors fail and retire as dawn approaches, and Penske remarkably moves out front by mid-morning, thrashing the remaining field by a considerable distance for an improbable victory. An American Wetanson Porsche 911T driven by Tony Adamowicz (US), Bruce Jennings (US), and Herb Wetanson (US) wins the GT competition by twelve laps ahead of a Porsche entry. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1969 XVIII Sebring 12 Hours Sebring, Florida 1969 XVIII Sebring 12 Hours At Sebring for the 12 Hour in March, a British Wyer Automotive Ford GT40 under Jacky Ickx (BE) and Jackie Olivier (GB) takes race honors and covers 1242.8 miles (record average 103.36 mph), a lap ahead of a Ferrari driven by Chris Amon and Mario Andretti. The Porsches break at midrace and Ickx moves out front after the race leading Amon-Andretti Ferrari suffers from overheating with less than two hours remaining. A Yenko Chevrolet Camaro Z28 under Don Yenko (US) and Bob Grossman (US) wins the GT competition by eight laps ahead of a Porsche entry. Photo Credit: Ford Motor Company.
1969 XXXVII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1969 XXXVII Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a 5-liter British Wyer Automotive Ford GT40 under Jacky Ickx (BE) and Jackie Oliver (GB) unexpectedly takes the flag and covers 4998 kilometers (average 129.40 mph), a few seconds (120 meters) ahead of a Porsche 917 driven by Hans Hermann and Gérard Larrousse. With only three hours remaining, both Wyer and Porsche battle head-to-head, including matching pit times, until the latter moves out front with an hour left on the clock. The much-feared Porsche 917 lead entry unexpectedly breaks down at 11 AM and the Ickx-Oliver Ford inherits the lead, dicing with another pursuing Porsche 917 over the final hours until Ickx uses a feint to trick and pass the race leading Hermann 917 at Mulsanne on the final circuit, thus securing the narrowest of victories in the 24. The formidable 12-cylinder 917 draws considerable controversy for its movable aerodynamic devices, a feature that perhaps contributes to the tragic death of privateer John Woolfe on Lap 1 in an overturn shunt at Maison Blanche. At the traditional driver dash to the entries at race start, Wyer pilot Ickx calmly walks to his GT40, buckles in, takes off in last place, and in one grand gesture ends the long-standing Le Mans starting ritual. A Belgian Gaban Porsche 911S under Jean-Pierre Gaban (BE) and Yves Deprez (BE) wins the GT competition by five laps over another Porsche entry. Many consider the 1969 edition as the greatest meeting ever hosted at the Sarthe. The race also claims the life of reputed driver Lucien Bianchi, who perishes in a practice session. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1968 LII Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1968 LII Targa Florio At Cerda for the Targa Florio (720 kilometers) in May, a German Porsche 907 under Vic Elford (GB) and Umberto Maglioli (IT) takes the flag in 6:28:47.9 (average 69.04 mph), under three minutes ahead of an ALFA Romeo driven by Ignazio Giunti and Nanni Galli. After falling eighteen minutes behind on the opening lap after dropping a right rear, Elford submits a remarkable charge back through the field, smashing his qualifying time by forty-five seconds, and passes the race leading ALFA Romeo driven by Galli with only two circuits remaining. A Swiss Ecurie Les Cosaires Porsche 911 driven by Claude Haldi (CH), Pierre Grueb (CH), and Edgar Berney (CH) wins the GT competition by a lap ahead of a Porsche driven by Armando Floridia and Vincenzo Mirto Randazzo. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1966 I Daytona 24 Hours Daytona Beach, Florida 1966 I Daytona 24 Hours At Daytona for the inaugural 24 Hours on a very chilly weekend in February, the race comes to a Shelby American Ford Mk II under Ken Miles (US) and Lloyd Ruby (US) that covers 2583.18 miles (average 107.56 mph), eight laps ahead of a companion Ford entry. The Miles-Ruby Ford entry moves out front in the first hour after the race leading Hall Chaparral suffers early mechanicals and never looks backs as the new and marvelous Mk II prototype sprints away for a wide margin victory. A German Porsche 904 GTS under Gerhard Mitter (DE) and Joe Buzzetta (US) takes the sportscar classification by two laps ahead of a companion Porsche entry. Despite the low attendance, promoter Bill France and motorsports enthusiasts around the world hail the new race format and unique track layout for an event that only grows in stature over the succeeding years. Photo Credit: ISC Images and Archives.
1966 XV Sebring 12 Hours Sebring, Florida 1966 XV Sebring 12 Hours At Sebring for the 12 Hour in March, a Shelby American Ford X1 Roadster under Ken Miles (US) and Lloyd Ruby (US) takes race honors and covers 1185.59 miles (record average 98.63 mph), twelve laps ahead of a Ford entry. The Miles-Ruby Ford moves out front after race leader Dan Gurney in his own Ford GT40 exhausts his fuel supply on the final lap. Gurney gamely pushes his entry across the finish line to claim the victory before the race stewards disqualify him for the same. A British Essex Ford GT40 under Skip Scott (US) and Peter Revson (US) take the sportscar classification by eight laps ahead of a Porsche entry. The race claims the lives of Bob McLean in a hairpin rollover shunt around 3 PM, and four spectators after a Porsche driven by Don Wester crashes into the crowd around 8 PM. Photo Credit: Bill Stowe.
1964 XIII Sebring 12 Hours Sebring, Florida 1964 XIII Sebring 12 Hours At Sebring for the 12 Hour in March, the race comes to an Italian Scuderia Ferrari 275 P under Mike Parkes (GB) and Umberto Maglioli (IT) that covers 1112.8 miles (record average 92.30 mph), a lap ahead of a companion Ferrari driven by Ludovico Scarfiotti and Nino Vaccarella. The Parkes-Maglioli Ferrari moves out front after passing the race leading Scarfiotti-Vaccarella companion Ferrari with only twenty minutes remaining. A Shelby American Cobra under Bob Holbert (US) and Dave MacDonald (US) wins the GT competition by four laps ahead of a companion Shelby entry. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1963 XLVII Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1963 XLVII Targa Florio At Cerda, Sicily for the Targa Florio (720 kilometers) in May, a German Porsche 718 GTR under Jo Bonnier (SE) and Carlo Maria Abate (IT) takes the flag in rainy conditions in 6:55:45.1 (average 103.98 mph), under twelve seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Lorenzo Bandini, Ludovico Scarfiotti, and Willy Mairesse. Bonnier moves out front after race leader Mairesse, enjoying a fifty second margin, spins out in the mud and lightning on the main straight to the finish, severely damaging his bodywork in the process. Mairesse recovers and desperately sprints to the wire, yet drops enough elapsed time to cede the victory to Bonnier-Abate. A German Porsche 356B under Edgar Barth (DDR) and Herbert Linge (DE) wins the GT competition by twelve seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Maurizio Grana and Gianni Bulgari. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1962 Daytona Continental 3 Hour Daytona Beach, Florida 1962 Daytona Continental 3 Hour At Daytona for the Continental 3 Hour in February, the race comes to an Arciero Lotus 19 Climax under Dan Gurney (US) that covers 312.42 miles (average 104.10 mph), forty-six seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Peter Ryan, Ricardo Rodríguez, and Phil Hill. Gurney moves out front past the race leading Hill Ferrari on Lap 19 of 82, yet with only two minutes remaining on the clock and leading by over a lap margin, Gurney suffers an engine mechanical only 200 yards from the finish line. Gurney stops his entry short of the wire, waits for the race clock to expire, and then nurses his faltering car over the line to ensure a victory. A NART Ferrari 250 GT SWB EXP under Stirling Moss (GB) wins the GT competition by three laps over a companion Ferrari entry. Photo Credit: ISC Images and Archives.
1960 VI Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen Mayen, West Germany 1960 VI Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen At the Nürburgring for the 1000 Kilometers in May, the race comes to an American Camoradi Maserati Tipo 61 under Stirling Moss (GB) and Dan Gurney (US) in misty conditions in 7:31:40.5 (average 82.84 mph), under three minutes ahead of a Porsche driven by Jo Bonnier and Olivier Gendebien. The Moss-Gurney Maserati sprints out to an early lead before stopping for service for a broken oil line on Lap 20. Fighting poor visibility and careful not to put a foot wrong in the wet, Gurney, trailing the leading Porsche by fourteen minutes, unfurls a fabulous and career-defining drive that runs down the leaders in time for Moss to take over and comfortably cross for victory. Photo Credit: Jim Miner.
1959 ADAC 1000 Kilometer ReMayen, West Germany 1959 ADAC 1000 Kilometer ReAt the Nürburgring for the 1000 Kilometer in June, a British Brown Aston Martin DBR1/300 under Stirling Moss (GB) and Jack Fairman (GB) takes the flag in 7:33:18.0 (average 89.20 mph), forty-one seconds ahead of a Ferrari driven by Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien. Moss opens up a sizeable lead until passing the entry to Fairman on Lap 17, yet the latter puts the Aston in a ditch on Lap 23. In remarkable fashion, Fairman climbs under the entry and uses his back to lift the same back onto the track. Trailing a leading pair of Ferrari entries by seventy seconds, Moss returns to the pilot seat and overtakes the Testa Rossas by Lap 23, opening a two minute gap over the same. Fairman loses the lead to Hill on his next stint before Moss again takes over and again sprints by the Hill Ferrari to win the event by nearly a minute, clearly ranking among the greatest drives of Moss' racing career. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1959 XXIV RAC Tourist Trophy Chichester, England 1959 XXIV RAC Tourist Trophy At Goodwood for the Tourist Trophy (6 Hours) in September, a Brown Aston Martin DBR1/300 under Carroll Shelby (US), Stirling Moss (GB), and Jack Fairman (GB) bests the field and covers 537.6 miles (average 89.41 mph), a lap ahead of a Porsche driven by Wolfgang von Trips and Jo Bonnier. Moss in natural fashion breaks out front in the lead with a comfortable margin before handing the controls to teammate Ray Salvadori, who stops for first service in the fourth hour. A mishandled refueling valve ignites an enormous pit fire that utterly destroys the Moss-Salvadori Aston entry and its service area. Trailing the lead Ferrari and Porsche entries by four minutes, Aston immediately moves Moss to join the Shelby-Fairman entry and in another stirring performance, the speedy Briton tracks down the front runners in efficient order, only requiring only ninety minutes to regain the lead. Moss pulls away for victory in a memorable effort and earns Aston Martin the WSC Championship by a narrow margin over both Ferrari and Porsche. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1958 IV Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen Nürburgring Mayen, West Germany 1958 IV Internationales ADAC 1000 Kilometer Rennen Nürburgring At the Nürburgring for the 1000 Kilometer in June, a British Brown Aston Martin DBR1/300 under Stirling Moss (GB) and Jack Brabham (AU) takes race honors in 7:23:33 (average 84.36 mph), under four minutes ahead of a Ferrari driven by Mike Hawthorn and Peter Collins. Moss rushes away to a considerable lead after the start before passing the entry to the young Brabham, and the inexperience of the latter costs the Aston the lead as the Hawthorn Ferrari moves out front on Lap 11. Moss returns to the seat after the Aston takes service on Lap 13 and soon regains the lead after Hawthorn stops for service on the same lap. Brabham and Moss again exchange at Lap 24 and maintain the lead, yet both Aston and Ferrari end up side-by-side in the service lane for their final respective stops at Lap 29. Moss gets away first before the Ferrari can complete service and then sprints away over the final fifteen laps for a dramatic victory as the Brown Aston Martin pull off a tremendous upset over the heavily favored Ferrari juggernaut. The race claims the life of Erwin Bauer, who perishes in his Ferrari after his unfortunate involvement in an off-circuit shunt on the continuation lap after the unfurling of checkers. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1955 XXIII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1955 XXIII Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for 24 Hour in June, a British Jaguar D-Type under Mike Hawthorn (GB) and Ivor Bueb (GB) takes the flag and covers 4135.38 kilometers (average 107.07 mph), five laps ahead of an Aston Martin entry. The British victory pales in comparison to the horrific happening at Maison Blanche triggered by Mercedes driver Pierre Bouillin (Levegh) on Lap 32 during the sixth hour. As a fleet of entries slow the pace to take on service, Hawthorn and Lance Macklin in his Austin Healey tangle, pushing Macklin into a line of swift oncoming traffic. Levegh helplessly slams into Macklin, then bounces off the inside ARMCO before his soaring entry, now completely aflame, soars over an embankment and lands into a crowded spectator observing area. The resulting horror kills eighty-four people outright, including Levegh, and injures scores more as the hot shrapnel effortlessly cuts through human bodies, leaving a virtual sea of carnage. While still holding a wide overall race lead margin, Daimler Mercedes withdraws from the contest around midnight amidst recriminations among race officials and civil authorities. Jaguar in turn refuses to withdraw and accordingly wins the event for the third time. Photo Credit: Automobile Club de l'Ouest. LAT Photographic Archive.
1955 L RAC Tourist Trophy Dundrod, Northern Ireland 1955 L RAC Tourist Trophy At Dundrod for the fiftieth running of the RAC Tourist Trophy (1000 kilometers), the oldest racing event in the world, in September, a German Daimler Mercedes 300 SLR under Stirling Moss (GB) and John Fitch (US) takes race honors in rainy conditions in 7:03:11 (average 88.32 mph), one lap ahead of a companion Mercedes driven by Juan Manuel Fangio and Karl Kling. Leading by ninety seconds at one-third distance, the Moss-Fitch entry drops a rear tire and stops for service, allowing the Hawthorn-Titterington Jaguar to move out front. Moss takes up hot pursuit yet fails to make up any ground on the swift lead Jaguar until the latter wrenchingly loses fire with only a few miles remaining, gifting the unanticipated win to Moss and Mercedes. The race claims the lives of Jim Mayers and William Smith, who both perish on a Lap 1 shunt, and Richard Manwaring, who succumbs after his crash on Lap 35. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1955 XXXIX Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1955 XXXIX Targa Florio At Cerda for the Targa Florio (936 kilometers) in October, a German Daimler Benz Mercedes 300 SLR under Stirling Moss (GB) and Peter Collins (GB) notches a victory in 9:43:14 (average 59.93 mph), just over four and a half minutes ahead of a companion Mercedes driven by Juan Manuel Fangio and Karl Kling. The final entry to leave the start, the Moss-Collins entry passes the entire field before the end of Lap 1 and survives a series of off-road mishaps before battling back and finally passing the Fangio-Kling Mercedes for a dramatic Targa victory. Photo Credit: Daimler AG.
1954 III Sebring 12 Hour Sebring, Florida 1954 III Sebring 12 Hour At Sebring for the 12 Hour in March, the race comes to a Cunningham OSCA MT4 1450 under Stirling Moss (GB) and Bill Lloyd (US) that covers 884 miles (average 72.80 mph), five laps ahead of a Lancia entry. The Cunningham entry moves out front after Piero Taruffi in his Lancia, leading by nearly ninety miles, suffers a mechanical failure with only an hour remaining. The Taruffi Lancia team literally pushes the disabled D24 first across the line before race officials disqualify the entry. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.floridastockcars.com/.
1954 XXII Le Mans 24 Hour Le Mans, France 1954 XXII Le Mans 24 Hour At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a 4.9-liter Italian Scuderia Ferrari 375 MM Plus under José© Froilán González (AR) and Maurice Trintignant (FRA) takes the flag and covers 4061.2 kilometers (average 105.16 mph), one lap ahead of a Jaguar driven by Duncan Hamilton and Tony Rolt. The Ferrari entry moves out front in the third hour, yet the new Jaguar D-Types refuse to relent and close to within ninety seconds of the lead with only an hour remaining. A fatigued González gingerly navigates his auto through a late race cloudburst with a water-soaked ignition over the closing laps to hold on for victory, the first for the Scuderia at the Sarthe.

Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1952 AAA I Sebring 12 Hour Sebring, Florida 1952 AAA I Sebring 12 Hour At Sebring for the inaugural 12 Hour in March, the race comes to a Donaldson Frazer Nash LM under Larry Kulok (US) and Harry Grey (US) in rainy conditions that covers 753.99 miles (average 62.80 mph), five laps ahead of a Jaguar entry. The Donaldson entry moves out front in the fourth hour after the race leading Spear Ferrari retires, allowing the Frazer Nash to motor away to a comfortable victory. The Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) refuses to sanction the event hosted by race organizer Alec Ulmann due to his preference for top-tier professional racers to the event (the SCCA at the time prefers amateur racing), yet the AAA steps in and agrees to lend its aegis to the contest. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1952 XX Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1952 XX Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a 3.0-liter German Daimler Benz Mercedes W194 Gull Wing under Hermann Lang (DE) and Fritz Riess (DE) takes the flag and covers 3733.8 kilometers (average 96.70 mph), a lap ahead of a companion Mercedes driven by Theo Helfrich and Helmut Niedermayr. The Lang-Reiss entry moves out front after the race leading Talbot Lago driven in a solo effort by Eugéne Bouillin (Pierre Levegh) breaks a piston rod in the twenty-third hour. Daimler Mercedes competes in France for the first time since the war and comes up victorious at the Sarthe. Photo Credit: Daimler AG.
1950 Sam Collier 6 Hour Sebring, Florida 1950 Sam Collier 6 Hour At Sebring, Florida for the Sam Collier 6 Hour in December, a Sharpe Cole Crosley Hot Shot under Fritz Koster (US) and Ralph Deshon (US) notches a victory and covers 381.42 miles, finishing ahead of a Ferrari entry. Koster and Deshon drive a 750 cc entry borrowed from spectator Victor Sharpe to run the event, and the pair win based upon a handicap formula despite running twenty fewer laps than three other entries. Not many observers at the time foresee that the 1950 event, named after a driver who perished at the Watkins Glen Grand Prix earlier in September and staged at an abandoned airfield in central Florida, will eventually become a fixture upon the international endurance racing calendar. Photo Credit: Sebring Archives.
1950 I La Carrera Panamericana Ciudad Juárez, México 1950 I La Carrera Panamericana At Ciudad Juárez for the inaugural running of the Carrera Panamericana in May, a five-day north-south megatrek along the newly constructed Panamerican Highway that spans 3436 kilometers and ends at El Ocotal at the Guatemala-México frontier. The race comes to an American Sundstrom Oldsmobile 88 under Herschel McGriff (US) and Ray Elliott (US) in 27:34:35 (average 78.40 mph), under sixty-seven seconds ahead of a Cadillac driven by Thomas Deal and Sam Cresap. Taking advantage of its heavy brakes, the Sundstrom entry moves out front on the final day after passing the race leading Deal Cadillac north of El Ocotal. The altitude variation covers over 10,000 feet, requiring daily carburetor adjustments for the entries. Two drivers and two spectators lose their lives in the spectacle. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1949 XIV Spa 24 Hours Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1949 XIV Spa 24 Hours At Spa for the 24 Hour in July, an American Chinetti Ferrari 166 MM under Luigi Chinetti (US) and Jean Lucas (FR) takes the flag and covers 3035.3 kilometers (average 78.70 mph), three miles ahead of a Delage driven by Henri Louveau and Edmond Mouche. The Chinetti Ferrari moves out front in the fourth hour and executes a clean running until with only thirty minutes remaining, Chinetti hits an oil patch on the circuit at Hallowell. Chinetti slides off the circuit and strikes a spectator before skidding into a nearby residence. Chinetti tends to the stricken spectator before returning to the circuit and thereafter limps around for two more laps to claim a deserving victory. Photo Credit: Attribution Unascertained.
1938 XV Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1938 XV Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a 3.6-liter French Chaboud Trémoulet Delahaye 135CS under Eugene Chaboud (FR) and Jean Trémoulet (FR) takes race honors and covers 3180.9 kilometers (average 82.36 mph), two laps ahead of a Delahaye entry. The Chaboud-Trémoulet Delahaye, only possessing one useable gear on Sunday morning, moves out front after the leading Sommer ALFA Romeo suffers a blown tire, develops an oil leak, and ultimately fails at Arnage Corner in the final hour. Photo Credit: LAT Photographic Archive.
1935 XIII Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1935 XIII Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a 4.5-liter British Fox and Nicholl Lagonda Meadows M45R Rapide under Johnny Hindmarsh (GB) and Luis Fontés (GB) takes the flag and covers 3006.8 kilometers (average 77.85 mph), under eight kilometers ahead of an ALFA Romeo entry. The Fox-Nicholl Lagonda moves to the front early Sunday morning after the leading ALFA Romeo entries retire, yet the Dreyfus ALFA Romeo remains in hot pursuit and then sits up in the saddle after the Lagonda suddenly slows with failing oil pressure in the 22nd hour. With twenty minutes remaining, the chasing Dreyfus team mistakenly informs its driver that his pass of the ailing Lagonda places his ALFA Romeo into the lead, and Dreyfus deliberately slows the pace to safely bring the entry home. With only five minutes left on the clock, the Dreyfus team learns to their horror that an amended scoring error by race officials still places the Lagonda in the lead. With matters settled for the chasing ALFA, the Lagonda sputters to a dramatic upset victory, making Fontés at 21 years of age the youngest Le Mans winner to date. Photo Credit: Automobile Club de l'Ouest.
1933 XI Le Mans 24 Hours Le Mans, France 1933 XI Le Mans 24 Hours At Le Mans for the 24 Hour in June, a 2.3-liter Italian SA ALFA Romeo 8C 2300 MM under Raymond Sommer (FR) and Tazio Nuvolari (IT) takes the flag and covers 3144.04 kilometers (record average 81.41 mph), under ten seconds ahead of a companion ALFA Romeo driven by Luigi Chinetti and Philippe de Gunsberg. Grappling with a leaking fuel tank, the Sommer ALFA Romeo resorts to using chewing gum to affect a repair. The Chinetti and Sommer entries dice with each other on the final circuit until Nuvolari edges past Chinetti at Arnage Corner and sprints away to victory, the closest finish to date at the Sarthe. Sommer wins the event for the second time. Photo Credit: PA Images.
1932 IX Spa 24 Hours Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium 1932 IX Spa 24 Hours At Spa for the 24 Hour in July, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari ALFA Romeo 8C 2300 MM under Count Antonio Brivio (IT) and Eugenio Siena (IT) takes race honors and covers 2785.9 kilometers (average 72.13 mph), under four kilometers ahead of a companion ALFA Romeo driven by Piero Taruffi and Guido d'Ippolito. Enthusiasts note that the 1932 event marks the first time that a racing entry displays the legendary Scuderia Ferrari Prancing Horse emblem, one that dates back to World War I and Italian pilot Francesco Baracca Photo Credit: formula1.ferrari.com/.
1931 XXII Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1931 XXII Targa Florio At Cerda for the Targa Florio (584 kilometers) in May, an Italian SA ALFA Romeo 8C Monza under Tazio Nuvolari (IT) in heavy rains takes race honors in 9:00:27 (average 40.3 mph), under two and a half minutes ahead of a companion ALFA driven by Baconin Borzacchini. Nuvolari, taking full advantage of the front fenders missing from the Bugatti contenders, prevails after putting in a swifter final lap than race leader Achille Varzi in his Bugatti, who struggles with muddied goggles over the final miles, for a popular victory. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.targapedia.com/.
1930 XXI Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1930 XXI Targa Florio At Cerda for the Targa Florio (540 kilometers) in May, an Italian Scuderia Ferrari ALFA Romeo P2 under Achille Varzi (IT) takes race honors in 6:55:16.8 (average 49.5 mph), under two minutes ahead of a Bugatti driven by Louis Chiron. Varzi, fearing the late race charging reputation of Chiron, miraculously recovers on the final lap after his ailing mechanic causes him to wreck on the approach to Collessano. Coping with two broken wheels (he fortunately carries spares) and a broken fuel tank, Varzi closes to within two minutes as his mechanic pours fuel into the holed tank while racing towards Campofelice, a circumstance that leads to an in-race fire after the spilling fuel coats his exhaust pipe. Despite the high drama, Chiron draws nearer yet still falls short to the irrepressible Varzi. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.alfaromeoworld.com/historic/.
1923 XIV Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1923 XIV Targa Florio At Cerda for the Targa Florio (432 kilometers) in April, the race comes to an Italian ALFA Romeo RLTF under Ugo Sivocci (IT) in 7:18:00.2 (average 36.77 mph), under three minutes ahead of a companion ALFA Romeo driven by Antonio Ascari. Sivocci moves out front on the final circuit after race leader Ascari loses drive on the final corner. Legend suggests that Sivocci, experiencing a stretch of bad luck during the season, adds the now reputed ALFA Romeo Quadrifoglio logo (four-leaf clover) to his entry. Sivocci tragically perishes during practice at the Italian GP at Monza two and a half months later. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: alfanatics.co.za. petrolicious.com/.
1923 I Grand Prix d' Endurance de 24 Heures Le Mans, France 1923 I Grand Prix d' Endurance de 24 Heures The Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO), centered at Le Mans, France, proposes to host an endurance automobile event in May at the Sarthe Circuit (each race lap length approximately ten miles in length) that spans twice around the clock (24 hours) as the ultimate test of man and machine. A 3.0-liter four-cylinder French Chenard Walcker Type U3 15CV Sport under André Lagache (FR) and René Léonard (FR) takes race honors in cold and rainy conditions and covers 2209.54 kilometers (average 57.2 mph), four laps ahead of a companion Chenard Walcker entry. The Chenard Walcker entries move out front on Saturday afternoon and never face any earnest competition throughout the contest. Photo Credit: Automobile Club de l'Ouest.
1922 XIII Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1922 XIII Targa Florio At Cerda for the Targa Florio (432 kilometers) in April, the race comes to a German Mercedes GP 14 under Conte Giulio Masetti (IT) in 6:50:50.4 (record average 39.20 mph), under two minutes ahead of a Ballot driven by Jules Goux. Trailing race leader Goux by a minute as both enter the final circuit, Goux loses his brakes and lurches off the circuit, gifting Count Masetti with his second consecutive Madonie victory. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.targaflorio.info/.
1919 X Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1919 X Targa Florio At Cerda-Circuito Madonie Palermo for the tenth running of the Targa Florio (432 kilometers) in November, the race comes to a French Peugeot L25 EXS under André Boillot (FR) in snow, sleet, and mud conditions in 7:51:01 (average 34.19 mph), under thirty-one minutes ahead of an Itala driven by Antonio Moriondo. Boillot moves past race leader René Thomas in his Ballot after first service and sprints away to a safe lead, only in stunning fashion to break loose on the last homestretch corner on the final lap while avoiding onlooking spectators on the circuit and smash his entry into the grandstand fence yards from the finish. Boillot and mechanic manage to extract the race car from the scene and back the same in reverse across the wire, yet jeers from the Italian crowd prompts French entry owner Ernest Ballot to convince his confounded and bloodied drivers to return to the crash site and re-cross the finish under power in a forward facing direction. Legend suggests that the winning Boillot faints after race officials award Peugeot with race honors. Photo Credit: Non-Primary: www.targaflorio.info/.
1906 I Targa Florio Cerda, Sicily 1906 I Targa Florio At Cerda, wine merchant Vincenzo Florio organizes the first annual Targa Florio race (446.5 kilometers) in May, run upon a treacherous approximately 149 kilometer course executed over three laps. An Italian Itala under Alessandro Cagno (IT) takes race honors in 9:33:22 (average 29.08 mph), over thirty-two minutes ahead of a companion Itala entry. The new race event ultimately ascends as among the premiere annual global meetings in endurance racing. Photo Credit: Public Domain.